Saturday, January 22, 2022

Horizon Forbidden West: Meet The Cast Of Guerrilla Games’ Upcoming RPG In New Trailer

We’re closing in on the release of Horizon Forbidden West and PlayStation is releasing more and more about the game. Yesterday, Guerrilla Games released a new Forbidden West story trailer, and you can check out some exclusive details we learned about it after talking to the team, and now the studio has released a special “meet the cast” trailer. It begins with an introduction to protagonist Aloy’s voice actor, Ashly Burch, who explains that Aloy had to step into a new role as the hero of the world. She also touches on the more adversarial aspect of Aloy and Sylens’ relationship. And speaking of Sylens, Lance Reddick is returning to voice the character last seen in the post-credits scene at the end of Horizon Zero Dawn. He talks about Sylens’ egomaniac personality and how that shapes his relationships in Forbidden West.  Click here to watch embedded media We also meet Kotallo’s voice actor, Noshir Dalal. Both newcomers to the series, Kotallo encounters Aloy at a time when his life is in major crisis. Kotallo’s chief envisions a peaceful alliance in the Forbidden West and it’s Kotallo’s mission to champion his chief’s cause. Joining Kotallo as a new character in the world of Horizon is Tilda, who is voiced by Matrix alumn Carrie-Anne Moss.  “I play this very interesting character named Tilda who is quite a dynamic character,” Moss says in the trailer. “As an artist, there’s a lot of freedom in doing something like this. You get to be in the moment, getting thrown direction from the director, getting to try it over and over again; I felt like creatively, it was a lot of fun. There’s a lot of mystery to her – I don’t want to say too much – but she’s an interesting character and I loved playing her.” Next up is Varl, voiced by John Macmillan. As Macmillan notes, Varl has been on a “heck of a journey.” He says the writers did a great job of evolving the character in Forbidden West as he’s more mature and more willing to challenge Aloy when needed. Erend, voiced by John Hopkins, is back too. He talks about Aloy’s disappearance at the end of Zero Dawn, which sets up a fractured relationship at the start of Forbidden West. Macmillan and Hopkins said their relationship as Varl and Erend evolved quite a lot in the game as the two are the new main allies of Aloy.  We also get a few glimpses at some new concept art for Forbidden West, which you can view below:  Click image thumbnails to view larger version                                                                                                               While waiting for Horizon Forbidden West to hit PlayStation 5 and PlayStation 4 on February 18, read what Guerrilla Games had to say about the game’s latest story trailer and then head to Game Informer’s Horizon Forbidden West hub, which features all kinds of new details from this month’s cover story. Read our thoughts on the first game in Game Informer’s Horizon Zero Dawn review after that.  Are you excited for Horizon Forbidden West? Let us know in the comments below!
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    2022 Video Game Release Schedule

    If you're wondering what games are coming up in 2022, we've put them all in one convenient location. This list will be continually updated to act as a living, breathing schedule as new dates are announced, titles are delayed, and big reveals happen. This should help you plan out your next several months in gaming and beyond. As the gaming calendar is constantly changing, we highly recommend you bookmark this page. You'll likely find yourself coming back to this to find out the most recent release schedule for the most anticipated games across PC, consoles, handhelds, and mobile devices. If you notice that we've missed something, feel free to let us know! Please note that games will not get assigned to a month until they have confirmed release dates. Pokémon Legends: Arceus January Deep Rock Galactic (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4) – January 4  – Read review Monster Hunter Rise (PC) – January 12  – Read review Spelunky 2 (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One) – January 12  – Read review Astroneer (Switch) – January 13 Shadow Man Remastered (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One) – January 13 God Of War (PC) – January 14  – Read review Shadow Man Remastered (Switch) – January 17 Nobody Saves the World (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) – January 18  – Read review River City Girls (PlayStation 5) – January 18  – Read review Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duel (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – January 19 Expeditions: Rome (PC) – January 20 Pupperazzi (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) – January 20  – Read review Rainbow Six Extraction (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Stadia, PC) – January 20  – Read review Windjammers 2 (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, Stadia, PC) – January 20  – Read review Baby Storm (Switch) – January 21 MouseCraft (Xbox One) – January 21  – Read review El Hijo - A Wild West Tale (iOS, Android) – January 25 The Artful Escape (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, Switch) – January 25  – Read review Circuit Superstars (PlayStation 4) – January 27 Daemon X Machina (PC) – January 27  – Read review Pokémon Legends: Arceus (Switch) – January 28 Uncharted: Legacy of Thieves Collection (PlayStation 5, PC) – January 28 Horizon Forbidden West February Life is Strange Remastered Collection (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – February 1 The Waylanders (PC) – February 2 Sherlock Holmes: Crimes And Punishments (Switch) – February 3  – Read review Dying Light 2 Stay Human (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – February 4 OlliOlli World (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – February 8 Sifu (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) – February 8 CrossfireX (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One) – February 10 Edge of Eternity (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One) – February 10 Kingdom Hearts 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue (Switch) – February 10  – Read review Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 + 2.5 Remix (Switch) – February 10 Kingdom Hearts III (Switch) – February 10  – Read review Know By Heart (PC) – February 10 Lost Ark (PC) – February 11 Dynasty Warriors 9 Empires (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, Stadia, PC) – February 15 Rumbleverse (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – February 15 Assassin's Creed: The Ezio Collection (Switch) – February 17 The King of Fighters XV (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, PC) – February 17 Total War: Warhammer III (PC) – February 17 Horizon Forbidden West (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4) – February 18 Destiny 2: The Witch Queen (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Stadia, PC) – February 22 Monark (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, Switch, PC) – February 22 Edge of Eternity (Switch) – February 23 Martha Is Dead (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – February 24 Elden Ring (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – February 25 Grid Legends (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – February 25 Tiny Tina's Wonderlands March Elex II (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – March 1 Far: Changing Tides (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – March 1 Pathfinder: Wrath of the Righteous (PlayStation 4, Xbox One) – March 1 Babylon's Fall (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) – March 3 Gran Turismo 7 (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4) – March 4 Triangle Strategy (Switch) – March 4 SpellForce III Reforced (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One) – March 8 Chocobo GP (Switch) – March 10 WWE 2K22 (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – March 11 Phantom Breaker: Omnia (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – March 15 Tunic (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) – March 16 Persona 4 Arena Ultimax (PlayStation 4, Switch, PC) – March 17  – Read review Stranger Of Paradise Final Fantasy Origin (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – March 18 Rune Factory 5 (Switch) – March 22 Kirby and the Forgotten Land (Switch) – March 25 Tiny Tina's Wonderlands (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – March 25 Starship Troopers - Terran Command (PC) – March 31 Weird West (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – March 31 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim April LEGO Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – April 5 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim (Switch) – April 12  – Read review Vampire: The Masquerade - Swansong May Vampire: The Masquerade - Swansong (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – May 19 Sons of the Forest (PC) – May 20 Forspoken (PlayStation 5, PC) – May 24 Saints Row August Saints Row (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) – August 23 Test Drive Unlimited Solar Crown September Test Drive Unlimited Solar Crown (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) – September 22 Starfield November Starfield (Xbox Series X/S, PC) – November 11 S.T.A.L.K.E.R. 2: Heart of Chernobyl December S.T.A.L.K.E.R. 2: Heart of Chernobyl (Xbox Series X/S, PC) – December 8 GhostWire: Tokyo To Be Announced A Little to the Left (PC) A Plague Tale: Requiem (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, Switch, PC) A Quiet Place Action Arcade Wrestling (Switch) Advance Wars 1+2: Re-Boot Camp (Switch) Aftermath (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, PC) Anno: Mutationem (PlayStation 4, PC) Arc Raiders (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) Arcadegeddon (PlayStation 5, PC) Ashwalkers (Switch) Asterigos (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) Avatar: Frontiers of Pandora (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, Stadia, PC) Away: The Survival Series (Xbox One) Aztech Forgotten Gods (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Backbone (Switch) Balsa Model Flight Simulator (PC) BattleCakes (Xbox One, PC) Bayonetta 3 (Switch) Bear and Breakfast (Switch, PC) Blazing Strike (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, Switch, PC) Blood Bowl 3 (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Blossom Tales 2: The Minotaur Prince (Switch, PC) Bomb Rush Cyberfunk (Switch, PC) Boundary (PlayStation 4, PC) Bright Memory: Infinite (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S)  – Read review Card Shark (Switch, PC) Choo-Choo Charles (PC) Circuit Superstars (Switch) Coffee Talk Episode 2: Hibiscus & Butterfly (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch) Company of Heroes 3 (PC) Crossfire: Legion (PC) Cult of the Lamb (PC) Cursed to Golf (Switch, PC) Cyber Knights: Flashpoint (PC, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android) Cyberpunk 2077 (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S)  – Read review Death Stranding Director's Cut (PC) Deathverse: Let It Die (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4) Demon Throttle (Switch) Destiny 2: Lightfall Destroy All Humans 2: Reprobed (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) Devolver Tumble Time (iOS, Android) Diablo Immortal (iOS, Android) Digimon Survive (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Dolmen (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Don't Starve Together (Switch) Dordogne (Switch, PC) Dragon Ball: The Breakers (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Dune: Spice Wars (PC) Dungeon Defenders: Awakened (PlayStation 4) EA Sports PGA Tour Earth Defense Force 6 (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4) Earthlock 2 (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) eFootball 2022 (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Eiyuden Chronicle: Rising (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) Endling (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Evil Dead: The Game (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Evil West (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Eville (PC) ExoMecha (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One) Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, Switch)  – Read review Final Fantasy VII Ever Crisis (iOS, Android) Forever Skies (PlayStation 5, PC) Frozen Flame (PC) GetsuFumaDen: Undying Moon (Switch, PC) GhostWire: Tokyo (PlayStation 5, PC) God of War: Ragnarok (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4) Goodbye Volcano High (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) Gotham Knights (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Grand Theft Auto V (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S)  – Read review Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy - The Definitive Edition (iOS, Android) Grime (Switch) Grotto (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch) Gungrave G.O.R.E. (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Hardspace: Shipbreaker (PC) Hello Neighbor 2 (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) Hindsight (Switch, PC, iOS) Hogwarts Legacy (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Homeworld 3 (PC) How to Say Goodbye (PC, Mac) I Am Jesus Christ (PC) In Sound Mind (Switch) Industries Of Titan (PC) Instinction (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Stadia, PC) Jack Move (Switch, PC) Joe & Mac: Caveman Ninja (PC) KartRider: Drift (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One) Keo (PC) Kerbal Space Program 2 (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Lab Rat (Xbox Series X/S, PC) Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light (Switch)  – Read review Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris (Switch)  – Read review Last Days of Lazarus (Xbox One, Switch, PC) League of Legends: Wild Rift (iOS, Android) Life is Strange Remastered Collection (Switch) Lil Gator Game (Switch, PC) Little Devil Inside (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Loot River (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) LumbearJack (Switch, PC) Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope (Switch) Marvel's Midnight Suns (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Metal Slug Tactics (Switch, PC) Metal: Hellsinger (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Midnight Fight Express (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Mineko's Night Market (Switch, PC, Mac) Moss: Book II (PlayStation VR) MultiVersus (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Necrobarista (PlayStation 4)  – Read review Neon White (Switch, PC) Nightingale (PC) No Place For Bravery (Switch, PC) Open Roads (PlayStation 4, PC) Oxenfree II: Lost Signals (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, Switch, PC) Pac-Man Museum + (Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Park Beyond (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) Phantom Abyss (PC) Planet of Lana (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) Pokémon Trading Card Game Live (PC, Mac, iOS, Android) Prehistoric Kingdom (PC) Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time Remake (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) ProtoCorgi (Switch, PC) Puzzle Quest 3 (PC, iOS, Android) Rawmen (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Read Only Memories: Neurodiver (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Redfall (Xbox Series X/S, PC) Replaced (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) River City Girls 2 (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Rogue Lords (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch) RPG Time: The Legend of Wright (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC, iOS, Android) Salt and Sacrifice (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) Scars Above (PC) Scavengers (PC) Scorn (Xbox Series X/S) Sea Of Stars (PC) Second Extinction (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One) Serial Cleaners (PC) Session (Xbox One, PC) Shadow Warrior 3 (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Shovel Knight Dig Shredders (Xbox Series X/S) Skull & Bones (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Slime Rancher 2 (Xbox Series X/S) Sniper Elite 5 (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Sol Cresta (PlayStation 4, Switch, PC) Somerville Sonic Frontiers (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Souldiers (Switch, PC) Soup Pot (Xbox Series X/S, PC) Splatoon 3 (Switch) Star Ocean The Divine Force (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Star Trek: Resurgence (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Star Wars: Hunters (Switch, iOS, Android) Steelrising (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) Stray (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) Suicide Squad: Kill The Justice League (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) System Shock (Remake) (PC) Tchia (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder's Revenge (Switch, PC) Temtem (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, Switch, PC) Terminator: Dark Fate – Defiance (PC) The Anacrusis (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) The Callisto Protocol The Chant (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) The House of the Dead: Remake (Switch) The Invincible (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) The Last Oricuru (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Sequel (Switch) The Lord of the Rings: Gollum (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) The Outlast Trials (PC) The Slormancer (PC) The Stanley Parable: Ultra Deluxe (PC) The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S)  – Read review The Wreck (PC) Thymesia (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PC) Trek to Yomi (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) Two Point Campus (PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC) Ultimate Fishing Simulator 2 (PC) Ultimate Rivals: The Court (PC) Untitled Layers of Fear Game Valheim (PC) Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodhunt (PlayStation 5, PC) Voidtrain (PC) Volcanoids (PC) Warhammer 40,000: Darktide (Xbox Series X/S, PC) We Are OFK (PlayStation 5, PlayStation 4, PC) We Are The Caretakers (Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC) Where the Heart Leads (PC) Wizard With a Gun (Switch, PC) Young Souls (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC)  – Read review Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duel (iOS, Android) « 2021 Video Game Release Schedule

    New Report Details Lego Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga’s Rocky Development And Studio Crunch

    Lego Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga got an April 5 release date this week after spending years in development limbo. For a while, it seemed like the project was in peril, and, according to a new report by Polygon, those fears appear to have merit. The outlet talked to 30 current and former employees of TT Games (speaking anonymously out of fear of retaliation) who revealed TT’s lifetime history of crunch, a negative workplace atmosphere, and how The Skywalker Saga’s development suffered from it.  The report highlights that after TT struck gold with its early Lego titles during the mid-2000s, it became a victim of its own success. The studio’s annual release cadence meant that overtime and crunch became not only normal but expected. Polygon’s sources described instances of studio leadership berating employees for taking breaks and questioning their commitment to the company. Some say working 80-100 hours six days a week was not uncommon. Other problems highlighted in the report include a gender wage gap for female employees and the lack of women in leadership or diversity in general. Women who spoke to Polygon also reported experiencing bullying and harassment. Though some leaders listened to employee feedback regarding these issues over the years, significant change never occurred.  Lego Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga served as the tipping point for these long-standing problems. The game has been in the works for five years, and those who spoke to Polygon say a major reason was the adoption of an unstable new proprietary engine, NTT. This engine became a bane to employees due to it missing key features and a difficult learning curve, thus lengthening production. But to avoid paying licensing fees for Unreal Engine (which TT’s employees campaigned to use instead), management stuck with NTT, which became the breaking point for frustrated employees who departed the studio.  The Skywalker Saga, which TT has positioned as the biggest Lego Star Wars game yet, also suffered from feature creep that led to constant revisions and months of work being tossed aside. Many staff members were also reassigned to other projects, baffling those who still had to work on getting The Skywalker Saga out the door. Divisive leadership changes and a questionable vision of the company’s future led to an exodus of over 40 employees from TT’s two studios since the start of 2021.  Polygon’s report does state that workers have noticed a slow but positive change at the studio in recent months and that they ultimately believe The Skywalker Saga will deliver on fan expectations. The entire write-up is worth a read and serves as another disappointing, but unfortunately common, example of the workplace reform needed for many studios in the game industry. We hope things improve for TT Games overall and that Lego Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga gives players the experience they’ve been dreaming of. [Source: Polygon]

    Windjammers 2 Review – A Fading Adrenaline Rush

    Publisher: Dotemu Developer: Dotemu Release: January 20, 2022 Rating: Everyone Reviewed on: PlayStation 4 Also on: PlayStation 5, Xbox One, Switch, Stadia, PC Windjammers 2 gives fans of the popular arcade game exactly what they want: more Windjammers. Outside of a sharp graphical facelift and some new competitors and arenas, don’t expect to find much to gnaw on after you’ve batted around the disc a few times. The sport remains a reflex-demanding delight, but the fun wanes after a few rounds on the court.  Windjammers pits two players against each other in an over-the-top frisbee version of air hockey. You shoot the disc at each other, attempting to nail it through the goal on your opponent’s side; you can also earn points if the disc touches the ground on their court, as in tennis. Getting the disc past your opponent involves executing a variety of wildly implausible shots that ricochet off walls or wrap around the court in flaming loop de loops. Windjammers 2 controls well, and I love using curved shots and other tricks to fool my opponents to zig where they should have zagged.  Click here to watch embedded media The game possesses a fighting-game level of depth despite its simple veneer, so I wish it had a more fleshed-out tutorial. Windjammers 2 has a lot of moves and nuance that the tutorial mode plainly explains through static slides. Committing pages of button commands to memory before starting a match is neither fun nor effective, and there’s no way to access the move list in the pause menu. I forgot how to execute a useful maneuver several times and had to decide whether to quit the arcade ladder to refresh my memory or continue flying blind. Modern fighting games have come a long way to onboard players, providing instruction as well as context for how and why a move should be executed. Windjammers 2 needs something similar because getting annihilated for matches and feeling like I didn’t have a great resource to turn to wore on me in the early goings. The roster features returning names and newcomers, each with speed/strength differences and dedicated special moves. My favorites include Sammy Ho, who fires a teleporting disc that disorients opponents, and Jao Raposa, whose pure speed makes him a mobility machine. Matches are largely balanced no matter which pairing of competitors faces off, but taking on the CPU in the short arcade mode is challenging to the point of frustration, even on Easy mode. Even when I pinpointed a clear opening, the AI often blocked my shots, no matter how fancy or mind-bending they were. That’s not entirely new for Windjammers, but at times I gave up on strategically lining up shots and resorted to serving any which way until I scored a lucky goal. Still, it’s hard to deny the fun, sweat-inducing intensity of a long back-and-forth volley and the triumph of tripping up your adversary for a score.  The arenas aren’t vastly different from each other beyond the visuals, but a few sport notable gimmicks. I like the casino stage the most, which regularly changes a goal’s point value roulette-style, adding a devious layer of luck and unpredictability. I appreciate the vibrant ’90s-inspired presentation and upbeat soundtrack as well.  Though enjoyable, Windjammers 2 is a bare package. The basic arcade, online, and versus modes didn’t engage me for the long haul. And there is a noticeable lack of unlockable rewards, characters, or cosmetics to work towards. Bragging rights and leaderboard dominance are your only incentives. The action is best enjoyed in short bursts, preferably against a friend in local versus or a stranger online. I respect this old-school approach as an older player, but I found it hard to stay motivated when all I could expect from winning a grueling round was a pat on the back and a “good job!” Windjammers 2 is an enjoyable throwback that proves its unique sport is still a blast, but the thrill is fleeting. I’m happy to see it return; I just wish it gave me more reasons to step on its court more often. Score: 6.75 Summary: Windjammers 2 gives existing fans more of the wacky disc hockey they love but not much else. Concept: Graphics: Sound: Playability: Entertainment: Replay: Click to Purchase

    What’s Your Favorite Resident Evil And Which One Do You Think Is The Best?

    Resident Evil is a classic video game franchise that’s been around for decades. And for good reason, too – whether you prefer the more hardened survival horror seen in the first few Resident Evil games (and the recent ones) or the more over-the-top action camp seen in later entries, the series has you covered. That’s probably what makes it such a beloved series: there’s a little something for everyone in it.  You might be wondering what has us pondering the Resident Evil series today. Well, 24 years ago, Resident Evil 2 hit PlayStation 1 on January 21, 1998. You read that right: the classic Resident Evil 2 is 24 years old! One year short of being old enough to rent a car! Happy 24th anniversary to Resident Evil 2, that shambled its way onto PlayStation 1 in January 21st, 1998. What are your fondest memories of the game? pic.twitter.com/tWI8A5MO8e — Resident Evil (@RE_Games) January 21, 2022 This anniversary got us thinking, though: what’s your favorite Resident Evil game, and which Resident Evil do you think is the best? For me, my favorite is Resident Evil 2 Remake. It’s timeless, the remake is one of the best remakes in recent memory, and the Raccoon City Police Department is still just as terrifying as it was 24 years ago. Also, Mr. X’s wild entrance and subsequent chase never cease to be thrilling.  However, I want to show a little love to Resident Evil VII: Biohazard. I love this game, even its faults. For me, some of the scariest types of horror out there often involve cannibalistic families and the like (think Wrong Turn and similar series). There's something unnerving about a family unit working together to, well, eat you. Plus, half of my family is from Louisiana, so the swamp of Biohazard hits a special (and scary) part of my heart. Fortunately, there are no water-sunk shacks and swampy houses to encounter when I see my family.  As far as the best Resident Evil? It’s still probably Resident Evil 4, but dangit, Resident Evil 2 Remake makes a strong case for that title. I suspect the rumored remake of Resident Evil 4 will definitively reclaim the title, especially considering how good the recent VR remake of Resident Evil 4 was.  We want to know what your answers are, though: What’s your favorite Resident Evil game in the series? Which Resident Evil game do you think is the best Resident Evil? Let us know in the comments below!

    Looking Back At Banjo-Kazooie | All Things Nintendo

    It's a slow week in the world of Nintendo, so we're taking the opportunity to stop and smell the honeycombs. This episode, we're using Banjo-Kazooie coming to the Switch Online Expansion Pack as our excuse to talk about everyone's favorite 64-bit bear-and-bird adventure. Joining Brian this week is Game Informer web designer and programmer Kristin Williams! If you'd like to follow the people from this episode on Twitter, hit the following links: Brian Shea (@brianpshea), Kristin Williams (@kistasaurus) The All Things Nintendo podcast is a weekly show where we can celebrate, discuss, and break down all the latest games, news, and announcements from the industry's most recognizable name. Each week, Brian is joined by different guests to talk about what's happening in the world of Nintendo. Along the way, they'll share personal stories, uncover hidden gems in the eShop, and even look back on the classics we all grew up with. A new episode hits every Friday! Be sure to subscribe to All Things Nintendo on your favorite podcast platform. The show is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Podcasts. 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:00:49 – First Nintendo Game/Favorite Nintendo Game 00:05:52 – Kristin's Work Behind-the-Scenes at Game Informer 00:10:56 – Spoiler-Free Warning About Pokémon Legends: Arceus Leaks 00:13:35 – New Eevee Skateboard Collaboration 00:15:12 – Dying Light 2 Delayed on Switch 00:16:46 – Banjo-Kazooie Now Available on Nintendo Switch Online 00:19:07 – Looking Back at Banjo-Kazooie 00:58:01 – Definitive Ranking: Platforming Mascots 01:01:00 – Who Is More Recognizable Today: Pikachu or Mario? 01:03:29 – eShop Gem of the Week: Untitled Goose Game If you'd like to get in touch with the All Things Nintendo podcast, you can do so by emailing [email protected], tweeting to Brian (@BrianPShea), or by joining the official Game Informer Discord server. You can do that by linking your Discord account to your Twitch account and subscribing to the Game Informer Twitch channel. From there, find the All Things Nintendo channel under "Community Spaces." For more Game Informer podcasts, be sure to check out The Game Informer Show, which covers the weekly happenings of the video game industry, and Video Gameography with host Ben Reeves, which explores the history of video games – one series at a time!

    What’s Your Favorite Resident Evil And Which One Do You Think Is The Best?

    Resident Evil is a classic video game franchise that’s been around for decades. And for good reason, too – whether you prefer the more hardened survival horror seen in the first few Resident Evil games (and the recent ones) or the more over-the-top action camp seen in later entries, the series has you covered. That’s probably what makes it such a beloved series: there’s a little something for everyone in it.  You might be wondering what has us pondering the Resident Evil series today. Well, 24 years ago, Resident Evil 2 hit PlayStation 1 on January 21, 1998. You read that right: the classic Resident Evil 2 is 24 years old! One year short of being old enough to rent a car! Happy 24th anniversary to Resident Evil 2, that shambled its way onto PlayStation 1 in January 21st, 1998. What are your fondest memories of the game? pic.twitter.com/tWI8A5MO8e — Resident Evil (@RE_Games) January 21, 2022 This anniversary got us thinking, though: what’s your favorite Resident Evil game, and which Resident Evil do you think is the best? For me, my favorite is Resident Evil 2 Remake. It’s timeless, the remake is one of the best remakes in recent memory, and the Raccoon City Police Department is still just as terrifying as it was 24 years ago. Also, Mr. X’s wild entrance and subsequent chase never cease to be thrilling.  However, I want to show a little love to Resident Evil VII: Biohazard. I love this game, even its faults. For me, some of the scariest types of horror out there often involve cannibalistic families and the like (think Wrong Turn and similar series). There's something unnerving about a family unit working together to, well, eat you. Plus, half of my family is from Louisiana, so the swamp of Biohazard hits a special (and scary) part of my heart. Fortunately, there are no water-sunk shacks and swampy houses to encounter when I see my family.  As far as the best Resident Evil? It’s still probably Resident Evil 4, but dangit, Resident Evil 2 Remake makes a strong case for that title. I suspect the rumored remake of Resident Evil 4 will definitively reclaim the title, especially considering how good the recent VR remake of Resident Evil 4 was.  We want to know what your answers are, though: What’s your favorite Resident Evil game in the series? Which Resident Evil game do you think is the best Resident Evil? Let us know in the comments below!

    Looking Back At Banjo-Kazooie | All Things Nintendo

    It's a slow week in the world of Nintendo, so we're taking the opportunity to stop and smell the honeycombs. This episode, we're using Banjo-Kazooie coming to the Switch Online Expansion Pack as our excuse to talk about everyone's favorite 64-bit bear-and-bird adventure. Joining Brian this week is Game Informer web designer and programmer Kristin Williams! If you'd like to follow the people from this episode on Twitter, hit the following links: Brian Shea (@brianpshea), Kristin Williams (@kistasaurus) The All Things Nintendo podcast is a weekly show where we can celebrate, discuss, and break down all the latest games, news, and announcements from the industry's most recognizable name. Each week, Brian is joined by different guests to talk about what's happening in the world of Nintendo. Along the way, they'll share personal stories, uncover hidden gems in the eShop, and even look back on the classics we all grew up with. A new episode hits every Friday! Be sure to subscribe to All Things Nintendo on your favorite podcast platform. The show is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Podcasts. 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:00:49 – First Nintendo Game/Favorite Nintendo Game 00:05:52 – Kristin's Work Behind-the-Scenes at Game Informer 00:10:56 – Spoiler-Free Warning About Pokémon Legends: Arceus Leaks 00:13:35 – New Eevee Skateboard Collaboration 00:15:12 – Dying Light 2 Delayed on Switch 00:16:46 – Banjo-Kazooie Now Available on Nintendo Switch Online 00:19:07 – Looking Back at Banjo-Kazooie 00:58:01 – Definitive Ranking: Platforming Mascots 01:01:00 – Who Is More Recognizable Today: Pikachu or Mario? 01:03:29 – eShop Gem of the Week: Untitled Goose Game If you'd like to get in touch with the All Things Nintendo podcast, you can do so by emailing [email protected], tweeting to Brian (@BrianPShea), or by joining the official Game Informer Discord server. You can do that by linking your Discord account to your Twitch account and subscribing to the Game Informer Twitch channel. From there, find the All Things Nintendo channel under "Community Spaces." For more Game Informer podcasts, be sure to check out The Game Informer Show, which covers the weekly happenings of the video game industry, and Video Gameography with host Ben Reeves, which explores the history of video games – one series at a time!

    New State Of The Industry Report Reveals Nearly 75% Of Devs Surveyed Aren’t Interested In NFTs

    Talk of NFTs, blockchain gaming, and play-to-earn models seem nigh unescapable these days, but it seems developers are still largely against them.  That’s because in a newly-released 2022 State of the Industry report from the Game Developers Conference (GDC), 70% of developers surveyed said they and their studio are not interested in NFTs. Seventy-two percent of those that answered said they and their studio aren’t interested in cryptocurrencies either, which are often used to purchase NFTs.  However 28% said they “are at least somewhat interested in cryptocurrency at their studio and 28% are at least somewhat interested in NFTs.” Only 1% of those surveyed said that their studio already uses cryptocurrency or NFTs in their development and game models. None of this is especially surprising, doubly so if you follow conversations of blockchain gaming and the like in industry spaces. NFTs and blockchain games are largely viewed negatively due to their part in ongoing environmental damage.  The use of cryptocurrencies and NFTs, and the mining of said currencies, results in millions of carbon dioxide emissions, which damage the Earth’s atmosphere. Ethereum, one of the most-used cryptocurrencies, though, is working on something it calls “The Merge,” which it says will “start the era of a more sustainable, eco-friendly Ethereum.” Only time will tell how green Ethereum becomes. There’s also the side of NFTs that feels particularly scam-like in nature, not to mention the dangers of play-to-earn models.  Elsewhere in the report, GDC says 83% of respondents said they are not involved in metaverse development while 17% said they are already working on a metaverse-related project. Another ongoing topic in the game development industry is workplace culture. Discussions of toxic office culture have been happening for years, but they were particularly highlighted by recent reports of sexual misconduct, mismanagement, and more at Activision Blizzard.  “This [Activision Blizzard reports of misconduct and more] has started a trend of companies reaching out to address misconduct and toxicity within the game industry,” GDC’s report reads. “At the time the survey was conducted, 38% of respondents said that their companies reached out to them to start a conversation about how misconduct and toxicity are handled in the industry; 62% said their companies did nothing. This shows a growing number of workplaces have taken at least some initiative to root out toxicity, while also pointing out the industry has a way to go. When asked about how their company responded, some respondents said their companies held group discussions on misconduct or reminded employees how to report improper behavior.”  In recent years of late, the idea of unionization has grown more popular in development and 55% of respondents said that workers in the games industry should unionize, which is the highest amount yet in the past 10 years of this survey. Eighteen percent, though, said they actually believe the industry will unionize while 23% said conversations about unionization at their workplace have happened.  “The respondents also shared how those companies have responded to union talks with their workers,” GDC’s report reads. “Thirty-six percent reported that their companies were supportive, compared to 8% that said their company opposed the unionization talks. More than one-fifth (21%) of respondents said their companies didn’t know that some of their employees were talking about unionizing.”  Even more topics, such as the demand for PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X/S consoles, are discussed in the report and you can read the full thing here.

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