Friday, May 7, 2021

Halo Debuts New 'World Of Halo' Stop-Motion Video Series, Episode 1 Available Now

While we continue to wait for a Halo Infinite release date other than the anticipated November 2021 window, the team over at 343 Industries has a different sort of Master Chief-inspired project to share. Using the Jazwares action figure line, the stop-motion series called World of Halo just debuted its first episode. You can watch it below. Spoiler alert: it's pretty awesome. The Jazwares line is surprisingly detailed for being a mere four inches tall and seeing them in action in this format is kind of cool to see as a Halo fan myself. From a fight to death with the iconic energy sword to seeing some of the most recognizable enemies in the Halo-verse, the first episode of this series has us pretty jazzed to see what's next. Especially being a massive collector.  [embedded content] Master Chief's badassery, glowing energy swords, grunts screaming in panic - what more could you want? Other than a Halo Infinite gameplay trailer, but don't worry about that. 343 Industries has recently confirmed that a new gameplay reveal is coming this Summer to show off what the team has been working on since criticism hit about its next-gen graphics.  In other Halo news, 343 recently shared off a new screenshot from the main campaign, which you can see here, detailing the various PC-specific settings for resolution. The team also confirmed that Halo Infinite will include cross-progression and crossplay between Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, and PC, so that anyone can enjoy the latest game without worried about being tied to one specific platform.  To learn more about Halo Infinite before the gameplay trailer drops in the coming months, you can scope out our dedicated game hub. From fan desires to inside looks, catch up on the latest news right here.  Thoughts on Halo Infinite and the latest stop-motion video with World of Halo? Sound off in the comments below; Cortana would want you to. 
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    Apple Watch Series 6 hands-on: Several new tricks in an exceedingly familiar package

    The whole story of the Apple Watch Series 6 is one we’ve heard before. Apple spent the initial 3 years of the Watch’s existence fine-tuning the fundamentals and developing a smartwatch that does the majority of things right. Since that time, it’s been a reliable march of incremental updates, like adding an always-on display, ECG measurements, cycle tracking and fall detection. That’s the case in 2020 with the Apple Watch Series 6 again, which physically looks and feels similar to its predecessor but sports some hidden hardware upgrades and new software tricks in watchOS 7. I’ve been utilizing the $399 Series 6 for days gone by 24 hours roughly, even though it’s hard to be impressed with a tool that feels so familiar, I’m definitely not either disappointed.

    Let’s obtain the hardware differences between your Series 6 and last year’s Series 5 taken care of. The Series 6 runs on Apple’s latest S6 system-in-package that it claims is 20 percent faster compared to the old one. The chip is more power-efficient compared to the last also, allowing the always-on display to be 2.5 times brighter than on the Series 5 and the Series is helped by it 6 charge faster.

    You won’t notice any glaring physical differences when considering the Series 6 and the Series 5 hand and hand. However, flip both smartwatches over and you’ll note that the sensor array has been updated to support its new blood oxygen measurement capabilities. There’s a fresh always-on altimeter inside also, in addition to a new U1 chip that delivers 5GHz Ultra and WiFi Wideband connectivity.

    Gallery: Apple Watch Series 6 hands-on photos | 11 Photos

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    The blood oxygen sensor and the accompanying app in watchOS 7 will be the big new fitness features on the Series 6 that want hardware not entirely on any Apple Watch. When going for a measurement, the sensor shines a variety of LED red and infrared lights on your skin and photodiodes capture the light that reflects back onto the lower of the Watch. That allows the sensor to look for the color of one’s blood, that may indicate the amount of oxygen present. The Watch will periodically take readings in the backdrop (frequently when you’re asleep), nevertheless, you can trigger them manually plus they take just 15 seconds also.

    Like measuring ECG, measuring blood oxygen requires just a few taps on the Watch’s screen, nevertheless, you have to wear the Watch in a particular way to get yourself a successful reading. It took at roughly seven attempts of fiddling with the placement before it had been got by me to work. Data came frequently once the Watch was as far up my arm as my small/medium sports band allows when secured on the 3rd notch. Apple provides guidelines in the blood oxygen app that explain proper placement, and something of the plain things it advises isn’t to put the Watch too low on the wrist.

    While it became easier and easier for me personally to take these measurements, I’m curious to observe how the Watch fares taking automatic readings while I’m asleep. It’s pretty possible for wearables to go around on your own wrist once you put them on to bed and which could affect the Watch’s capability to capture blood oxygen information accurately, if.

    The new solo loop band may be Apple’s real method of addressing that potential problem. This new band is really a single little bit of swimproof, liquid silicone that stretches around your wrist. It will come in nine (yes, nine) sizes and you will download a printable tool from Apple’s website which will help determine the correct one for you personally. My solo loop came in a size 3 and, while a little is taken because of it of finagling to obtain it on / off, it’s convenient than I thought it will be. Most importantly, the Watch is kept because of it flush against my skin so that it may take accurate blood oxygen readings.

    Let’s have a step and discuss general performance back. The Series 6 is certainly faster compared to the Series 5 and the increased snappiness is most noticeable when launching apps and swiping between watch faces. Apple still doesn’t allow developers to create watch faces from scratch, however they is now able to customize some Apple-made designs with complications which are highly relevant to their apps. I enjoyed the brand new really, all day long customizable Memoji face since it i want to have just a little ghost friend with me, floating in and out of frame whenever I turned my wrist up.

    The ghost Memoji watch face in watchOS 7.

    But the brand new clock designs and the couple of new apps in watchOS 7 will be the biggest visual differences you’ll see — ultimately, wearing and getting together with the Series 6 is an extremely similar experience compared to that of the Series 5. The most recent way to utilize the device in watchOS 7 is sleep mode (when you can call it an interaction) and I haven’t had the opportunity to test that out yet.

    Even though Apple didn’t extend the battery life on the Series 6 to support sleep mode, the S6 chip allows the brand new Watch to charge 40 percent faster than its predecessor roughly. Which means you’ll get a lot more juice out of a one-hour charging session before bed than you’ll on a vintage Watch model. I sat my Series 6 on its charger for a half hour while eating dinner so when I wear it again it had 25 % more battery.

    day is hand-washing alerts

    Another new feature in watchOS 7 that I inadvertently experienced a whole lot in the last. With this particular enabled, the Watch counts down from 20 when it recognizes that you’re washing the hands ( predicated on motion and the noise of running water). It’s a classic feature that keeps you honest — not merely does the Watch provide haptic feedback through the countdown, however the on-screen timer actually stops in the event that you stop up scrubbing prior to the time is. While a gimmick, it’s a fairly useful one which, COVID-19 aside, some social people might use within their daily lives.

    Most of the brand new features that I can’t talk with yet are ones that want a few days to try out — sleep tracking, long-term VO2 max blood and calculations oxygen measurements being the most crucial among them. However the Apple Watch Series 6 has made an excellent first impression. Could it be worth an upgrade from the Series 5? We’ll wait to answer that inside our full review, but regardless, the Series 6 looks to be always a promising (if subtle) update to an already excellent smartwatch.

    Apple Watch Series 6 vs. Apple Watch SE vs. Apple Watch Series 3

    Apple Watch Series 6

    Apple Watch SE

    Apple Watch Series 3

    Price

    $399 and up

    $279 and up

    $199 and up

    Display

    LTPO OLED Retina, always-on

    LTPO OLED Retina

    LTPO OLED Retina

    Processor

    Apple S6

    Apple S5

    Apple S3

    Storage

    32 GB

    32 GB

    8 GB

    Sizes

    40mm, 44mm

    40mm, 44mm

    38mm, 42mm

    WiFi

    802.11b/g/n, dual-band

    802.11b/g/n, 2.4 GHz

    802.11b/g/n 2.4GHz

    Optional LTE

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    Bluetooth

    v5.0

    v5.0

    v4.2

    U1 chip

    Yes

    No

    No

    NFC

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    GPS

    GPS, GNSS, compass

    GPS, GNSS, compass

    GPS, GNSS

    Health sensors

    Heart rate, blood oxygen, ECG

    Heart rate

    Heart rate

    Always-on altimeter

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    Fall detection

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    Water resistance

    5 ATM

    5 ATM

    5 ATM

    Battery

    Up to 18 hours

    Up to 18 hours

    Up to 18 hours

    Operating System

    watchOS 7

    watchOS 7

    watchOS 7

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