Sunday, May 9, 2021

Yakuza Combat Will Forward Be Turn-Based Going

Following the reveal of Lost Judgment, an interview with Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio director Toshihiro Nagoshi and producer Kazuki Hosokawa has surfaced on IGN. Lost Judgment brings Ryu Ga Gotoku back to its action-combat roots, leaving many fans to wonder if that meant the Yakuza series would also return to that style following last year's Yakuza: Like a Dragon.Speaking to IGN, Nagoshi and Hosokawa confirmed that the Judgment series will carry on the studio's action style of gameplay, while Yakuza will continue to evolve as a turn-based RPG. "The Yakuza series has been transformed into a turn-based RPG," they told IGN. "On the other hand, over the years, Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio has accumulated resources and know-how of making flashy and exhilarating action games that are effortless to enjoy. We decided that we should let our signature action gameplay live on through Lost Judgment." Yakuza: Like a Dragon's turn-based combat Romain Mahut of GameBlog was in attendance at a virtual "Judgment Day" event that followed the Lost Judgment reveal and asked if the studio considered using turn-based combat similar to that of Yakuza: Like a Dragon for Lost Judgment. "For Yakuza: Like a Dragon, we changed the game's battle system from action into a turn-based RPG," Nagoshi said in response. "This was a huge challenge for us, but it was well-received, which we were thrilled to hear. We did discuss the possibility of developing that battle system further for our next title, and while we may pursue the turn-based system even outside the Yakuza series, the conclusion we ended up at was that because this is a different series, the best approach would be to keep them separate and refine what makes each series great. It's my hope that our customers feel the same way we do. That's why we chose 'action' as an important keyword for the Judgment series.  Nagoshi also said on the Judgment Day video he believes that, when possible, a simultaneous global launch is "the right way to go" and that the team has "determined to make every effort to support this for all [its] games moving forward." This is significant as the Yakuza series has a long tradition of Western versions releasing years after the Japanese version. Following the success of Yakuza 0 in the West, the release windows have narrowed, but Yakuza: Like a Dragon, which debuted last year, still had a 10-month gap between the Japanese and worldwide releases. Lost Judgment's action-oriented combat Yakuza: Like a Dragon is available now on PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC, while Lost Judgment comes to PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One on September 24. For more on what we thought about Yakuza: Like a Dragon, check out our review here. For more on the history of the Yakuza series, read our retrospective featuring interviews with Nagoshi and other members of the team here. For more information on Nagoshi's career, you can read our profile on him here. [Source: IGN, Sega of America on YouTube]
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    Facebook will start paying UK publishers for news stories

    Facebook branding is seen in a workspace at the company's offices in London, Britain, January 20, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville

    Facebook’s dedicated News tab, first seen in the US, will launch in the UK with a promise to pay UK news sites to license articles, the social media giant announced. It’ll arrive in January 2021 with partner sites including The Guardian, The Economist and The Mirror, along with lifestyle sites owned by Conde Nast, Hearst and others.

    “With Facebook News, we will pay publishers for content that is not already on the platform, help publishers reach new audiences and bring more advertising and subscription opportunities,” Facebook wrote in a blog post.

    As with the US News section, the UK tab will offer a mix of personalized and curated top stories. Facebook will normally show top headlines and stories, but will add news digests with original and “authoritative” reporting during major news cycles. The tab will build on the success of the US site, Facebook said, “where we’ve found more than 95 percent of the traffic Facebook News delivers to publishers is new audiences that have not interacted with those news outlets in the past.”

    Facebook didn’t say how much it would pay publishers, but some expect millions of pounds each year from multi-year details, The Guardian reported. That means Facebook could be paying tens of millions in the UK alone, much-needed revenue for struggling news outlets. It may also feature smaller local sites that have not struck deals, provided they meet certain standards, and Facebook plans to add more major news providers down the road.

    Along with Google, Facebook has been heavily criticized for drawing ad dollars away from dedicated news sites. That has contributed to the failure of a quarter of US news sites over the last 15 years, according to Poynter. In the UK, 198 local newspapers have shuttered since 2005, the Press Gazette reported in 2016. Meanwhile, the professional journalism vacuum has often been filled by false or misleading news on Facebook.

    Facebook has attempted to stem that criticism in the UK and ward off potential government regulation with several measures. For instance, it spent £4.5 million ($6 million) training 80 journalists to cover smaller communities and recently extended that program for a year with an additional £2.3 million ($3.1 million).

    Last month, Google also pledged $1 billion for publishers to curate content for a new product called the Google News Showcase. Google has taken even more heat than Facebook, with publishers in Australia, France and elsewhere saying it has contributed to the decline of local journalism and should be forced to pay to show news “snippets.”

    However, both sites will be under further pressure and scrutiny in the UK from a new regulatory agency called the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA). That body will set new limits on tech’s biggest platforms and create rules that level the playing field for smaller rivals. 

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