Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Jordan Vogt-Roberts to Helm Netflix’s Live-Action Gundam Movie

(Photo Credit: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)Jordan Vogt-Roberts to helm Netflix’s live-action Gundam movieIt has been four years since the successful release of Kong: Skull Island, and now director Jordan Vogt-Roberts has finally found his next big project with Legendary. Vogt-Roberts has officially signed on to direct the studio’s first-ever live-action feature film version of Gundam for Netflix, which will be based on the universe of Sunrise’s iconic Japanese robot franchise.This marks Legendary and Netflix’s latest collaboration together, the two companies previously worked on films such as 2016’s Spectral and last year’s Enola Holmes as well as shows like Lost in Space and Pacific Rim: The Black. They are also currently working on the anime series adaptation of Skull Island and Tom Raider.RELATED: Netflix’s Live-Action Cowboy Bebop Series Wraps Production!Plot details for the Netflix film are being kept under wraps but the original Gundam series is set in the Universal Century, an era in which humanity’s growing population has led people to emigrate to space colonies. Eventually, the people living in the colonies seek their autonomy and launch a war of independence against the people living on Earth. Through the tragedies and discord arising from this human conflict, not only the maturation of the main character but also the intentions of enemies and the surrounding people are sensitively depicted. The battles in the story, in which the characters pilot robots known as mobile suits, are wildly popular. The Gundam universe is replete with numerous storylines of love and conflict along with the popular Gundam battles, in which the characters operate robot suits called Mobile Suits.The live-action Gundam film will be penned by Brian K Vaughan. It will be produced by Vogt-Roberts with Vaughan set as executive producer. Legendary’s Cale Boyter will oversee the project along with the Sunrise creative team. The project was actually first announced in 2018 at the Anime Expo.RELATED: Sony & Netflix Ink First-Pay Streaming Licensing DealCreated by Hajime Yatate and Yoshiyuki Tomino, the franchise first started in 1979 with the TV series titled Mobile Suit Gundam. The massively popular Mecha anime and science fiction media franchise is Sunrise’s multi-billion-dollar property that has spawned a multi-platform universe encompassing televised anime, manga, animated films, video games, plastic models, toys, and novels among other media. Gundam continues to dominate Bandai Namco’s earnings almost forty years after its inception.
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    Big Tech net and critic neutrality advocate Tim Wu is joining the White House

    The man who coined net neutrality is heading back to work for the government. President Joe Biden has appointed Columbia law professor Tim Wu to the White House's National Economic Council. According to The New York Times, he'll serve as a special assistant to the president, advising him on technology and competition policy. It's an appointment that does not require approval from the Senate. Happy to say I'm joining the Biden White House to work on Technology and Competition Policy at the National Economic Council. Putting this twitter feed on hold for now -- so long! — Tim Wu (@superwuster) March 5, 2021 While he's best known for advocating for a free and open internet, Wu has also called for the breakup of Facebook and other Big Tech companies in more recent years. In 2018, he published The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age. There he argues the concentration of economic power in just a few companies has led to the current political climate of low wages and extreme nationalism. This is not Wu's first stint in government, nor is it his first time on the National Economic Council. He was also a member of the organization during the Obama administration, which did little to check the growth of companies like Facebook and Amazon. "I worked in the Obama administra­tion, and I worked in antitrust, so I will take some personal blame here, but we have not provided the merger oversight we should have," he said of his time on the Council in a 2019 interview. 

    Day political ads google reportedly plans to ban post-election

    Sponsored Links Joaquin Corbalan via Getty Images Google will not run any election-related ads after polls for the US presidential election close on November 3rd, according to Axios. In an email obtained by the publication, the search giant warns advertisers they won’t be able to run ads “referencing candidates, the election or its outcome, given that an unprecedented amount of votes will be counted after election day this year."  In the same email, Google says it will likewise ban ads that target people using election-related terms, including the names of specific candidates. Axios reports the policy applies to all of the platforms where the company runs advertisements, including YouTube. We’ve reached out to Google for comment, and we’ll update this article with the company’s response. If the email is accurate, it would follow a similar announcement from Facebook. The company recently clarified its stance on election day ads, saying it would not accept new ones in the week leading up to November 3rd. It also stated it plans to reject ads from political campaigns that declare victory before official results are available. In this article: Google, election, ads, internet, Facebook, trump, Biden, advertising, Political ads, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 109 Shares Share Tweet Share

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