Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Jordan Vogt-Roberts to Helm Netflix’s Live-Action Gundam Movie

(Photo Credit: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)Jordan Vogt-Roberts to helm Netflix’s live-action Gundam movieIt has been four years since the successful release of Kong: Skull Island, and now director Jordan Vogt-Roberts has finally found his next big project with Legendary. Vogt-Roberts has officially signed on to direct the studio’s first-ever live-action feature film version of Gundam for Netflix, which will be based on the universe of Sunrise’s iconic Japanese robot franchise.This marks Legendary and Netflix’s latest collaboration together, the two companies previously worked on films such as 2016’s Spectral and last year’s Enola Holmes as well as shows like Lost in Space and Pacific Rim: The Black. They are also currently working on the anime series adaptation of Skull Island and Tom Raider.RELATED: Netflix’s Live-Action Cowboy Bebop Series Wraps Production!Plot details for the Netflix film are being kept under wraps but the original Gundam series is set in the Universal Century, an era in which humanity’s growing population has led people to emigrate to space colonies. Eventually, the people living in the colonies seek their autonomy and launch a war of independence against the people living on Earth. Through the tragedies and discord arising from this human conflict, not only the maturation of the main character but also the intentions of enemies and the surrounding people are sensitively depicted. The battles in the story, in which the characters pilot robots known as mobile suits, are wildly popular. The Gundam universe is replete with numerous storylines of love and conflict along with the popular Gundam battles, in which the characters operate robot suits called Mobile Suits.The live-action Gundam film will be penned by Brian K Vaughan. It will be produced by Vogt-Roberts with Vaughan set as executive producer. Legendary’s Cale Boyter will oversee the project along with the Sunrise creative team. The project was actually first announced in 2018 at the Anime Expo.RELATED: Sony & Netflix Ink First-Pay Streaming Licensing DealCreated by Hajime Yatate and Yoshiyuki Tomino, the franchise first started in 1979 with the TV series titled Mobile Suit Gundam. The massively popular Mecha anime and science fiction media franchise is Sunrise’s multi-billion-dollar property that has spawned a multi-platform universe encompassing televised anime, manga, animated films, video games, plastic models, toys, and novels among other media. Gundam continues to dominate Bandai Namco’s earnings almost forty years after its inception.
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    TikTok forms an EU Safety Advisory Council following scrutiny from regulators

    TikTok has established a Safety Advisory Council for Europe that will shape its content moderation policies amid a buildup of complaints and probes against the app in the continent. The creation of the nine-member panel, which includes anti-bullying and mental health experts, follows the US Content Advisory Council the Chinese-owned platform formed last March.  TikTok's European delegates include academics and members of non-profits that specialize in dealing with child abuse, addiction, violent extremism, discrimination and cyber-bullying. It says the council will help it to develop "forward-looking policies" that address current and emerging challenges facing its thriving community. While the above issues aren't strictly limited to the video-sharing platform and affect all social networks alike, TikTok is facing heightened scrutiny in Europe over security and privacy concerns that relate to the welfare of its younger user base. EU watchdogs had already launched a glut of probes investigating its data-sharing practices before the app was hit with a massive consumer complaint last month. In it, a grouping of consumer watchdogs alleged it was breaking GDPR laws by hoarding personal information, hiding its policies behind vague terms and conditions and blurring the line between advertising and user-generated content.  At the time, TikTok said it was ready to meet with the consumer organizations (a collective known as the BEUC) to discuss their concerns. Despite some of its failings, its latest move is also aimed at engaging with regulators as it seeks to further promote its user safety policies.

    TikTok bans ads for fasting weight and apps loss supplements

    Sponsored Links Anatoliy Sizov via Getty Images TikTok is introducing a new policy that cracks down on ads that “promote a harmful or negative body image.” The app’s new rules ban companies from advertising fasting apps and weight loss supplements. Advertisers also have to adhere to new, tougher restrictions on weight loss ads that they can continue to run on the platform. For instance, ads prompting weight management products won’t be able to target users under the age of 18. TikTok is also partnering with the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) to connect its users to resources offered by the organization directly within the app. One aspect of the partnership will see TikTok redirect people to the NEDA hotline when they search for topics and hashtags flagged by the non-profit. “As a society, weight stigma and body shaming pose both individual and cultural challenges, and we know that the internet, if left unchecked, has the risk of exacerbating such issues,” the company said. “That's why we're focused on working to safeguard our community from harmful content and behavior while supporting an inclusive — and body-positive — environment.” While a step in the right direction, ads promoting unhealthy dieting are only part of TikTok’s body image problem. There’s also the issue of TikTok users who post that content. The app’s community guidelines ban videos that “promote eating habits that are likely to cause health issues,” but you can still find countless proana videos on the platform despite those rules. Then there’s the opaque algorithm that powers TikTok’s For You feed. Earlier this year, BuzzFeed News detailed how the app exposes people to content that glorifies unhealthy eating and weight loss habits through its home page. TikTok points out people can long-press on a video to stop similar content from showing up on their For You feed, but that doesn't solve the problem of that those types of videos showing up in the first place. In this article: body image, TikTok, ads, Social media, body positivity, social networking, Bytedance, advertising, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 83 Shares Share Tweet Share

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