Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Jordan Vogt-Roberts to Helm Netflix’s Live-Action Gundam Movie

(Photo Credit: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)Jordan Vogt-Roberts to helm Netflix’s live-action Gundam movieIt has been four years since the successful release of Kong: Skull Island, and now director Jordan Vogt-Roberts has finally found his next big project with Legendary. Vogt-Roberts has officially signed on to direct the studio’s first-ever live-action feature film version of Gundam for Netflix, which will be based on the universe of Sunrise’s iconic Japanese robot franchise.This marks Legendary and Netflix’s latest collaboration together, the two companies previously worked on films such as 2016’s Spectral and last year’s Enola Holmes as well as shows like Lost in Space and Pacific Rim: The Black. They are also currently working on the anime series adaptation of Skull Island and Tom Raider.RELATED: Netflix’s Live-Action Cowboy Bebop Series Wraps Production!Plot details for the Netflix film are being kept under wraps but the original Gundam series is set in the Universal Century, an era in which humanity’s growing population has led people to emigrate to space colonies. Eventually, the people living in the colonies seek their autonomy and launch a war of independence against the people living on Earth. Through the tragedies and discord arising from this human conflict, not only the maturation of the main character but also the intentions of enemies and the surrounding people are sensitively depicted. The battles in the story, in which the characters pilot robots known as mobile suits, are wildly popular. The Gundam universe is replete with numerous storylines of love and conflict along with the popular Gundam battles, in which the characters operate robot suits called Mobile Suits.The live-action Gundam film will be penned by Brian K Vaughan. It will be produced by Vogt-Roberts with Vaughan set as executive producer. Legendary’s Cale Boyter will oversee the project along with the Sunrise creative team. The project was actually first announced in 2018 at the Anime Expo.RELATED: Sony & Netflix Ink First-Pay Streaming Licensing DealCreated by Hajime Yatate and Yoshiyuki Tomino, the franchise first started in 1979 with the TV series titled Mobile Suit Gundam. The massively popular Mecha anime and science fiction media franchise is Sunrise’s multi-billion-dollar property that has spawned a multi-platform universe encompassing televised anime, manga, animated films, video games, plastic models, toys, and novels among other media. Gundam continues to dominate Bandai Namco’s earnings almost forty years after its inception.
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    The very best smart lights for the bedroom

    All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Waking up to the sound of a blaring alarm can be jarring, especially if you have to do so in pitch black. That’s why some people have turned to devices that mimic the arrival of daylight as a gentler way to stir from slumber. So-called sunrise or wake-up-light clocks typically start out with a dim light and then gradually brighten to full brightness in order to match your body’s circadian rhythms. If you have a particularly tough time waking up, you probably do still need an alarm, but the sunrise light should at least make it easier. There are several products on the market that have this feature; some are alarm clocks, some are smart displays, while others are simply programmable lights. Some only have sunrise features, while others have sunset features too (where the lights gradually dim and go dark), which could help you get to sleep in the first place. Sunrise and wake-up clocks Philips Philips SmartSleep Connected Sleep and Wake-up Light Philips sells a whole range of sunrise alarm clocks, and the one with the most bells and whistles is the SmartSleep Connected Sleep and Wake-Up Light. You can use a companion app to program your sunrise and sunset times as well as set different alarms for different days of the week. You can do that manually too, but the app makes it a lot easier. You can use the app for logging your sleep and wake times. The SmartSleep also offers several alarm sounds, customizable sunrise themes and a red-tinted light setting that’s more soothing than the default white light. In addition, you’ll find specialized sunset features that can help you wind down before bed. The light can be set to gradually dim over time, and it comes with relaxation cues like breathing exercises and calming sounds, like rainfall and ocean waves. As a bonus, the SmartSleep HF3670 also has sensors for humidity, light and noise levels, and the app will let you know if you need to adjust them to achieve ideal sleeping conditions. For a cheaper and more stripped-down option, consider Philips’ $100 Wake-Up Light HF3520. It lacks WiFi capabilities so there’s no companion app and it doesn’t have the extra relaxation settings of the SmartSleep, but it still includes that red-tinted light setting, along with similar sunrise and sunset features and a decent array of alarm sounds. Buy Smart Sleep light at Amazon - $180 Buy Wake-up light at Amazon - $100 Hatch Restore Hatch If getting to sleep is just as challenging as waking up, if not more so, you might want to consider the Hatch Restore, which brings a bunch of sleep-friendly features. It has Bluetooth and WiFi, which you can use to connect to a companion app. That app in turn lets you customize your sunrise and sunset routines as well as set different alarms for different days. On top of that, the Hatch Restore has several color lighting options that range from Warm White to Peach and Raspberry. True to its name, the Restore has various wind-down features that could help you fall asleep more easily. It has over 31 sleep sounds to block unwanted noise, plus a library of over 50 meditations and eight sleep stories. The caveat here is that the meditations and stories aren’t free. Hatch will offer owners a free trial of the full library for six months, but it costs $5 a month or $50 a year thereafter. That said, if you wanted an all-in-one machine to help address your sleep and wake issues, the Hatch Restore might be worth a look. Buy Hatch Restore at Amazon - $130 Smart display clocks Engadget Lenovo Smart Clock Almost all smart displays have some kind of sunrise alarm feature, especially the ones that are designed to sit on your nightstand. The Lenovo Smart Clock is one of our favorites, even if it lacks many of the usual smart display features like the ability to play videos. That’s because it’s adorable, won’t take up a lot of space and it’s affordable, to boot. Plus, it comes with eight different clock faces, six alarm tones and you can smack the top of it to either snooze or dismiss the alarm. When enabled, the sunrise alarm will gradually brighten the display for 30 minutes before the set time. Since it’s a Google-powered device, it also works with all the usual Google Assistant features like telling you the five-day weather forecast or your upcoming appointments. It surfaces reminders of future events plus offers to set alarms so you don’t miss them. You can use it to display your Google Photos and it works with other smart home devices you might own, like Philips Hue lights or a Nest Hello video doorbell. Buy Lenovo Smart Clock at Best Buy - $80 Google Nest Hub Engadget As mentioned, the Lenovo Smart Clock is really more of , well, a clock than a smart display. If you do want more of a typical smart display, the Google Nest Hub is a much better bet. It has all of the features of the Lenovo Smart Clock and then some. The screen is sharp and colorful, making it great for displaying photographs and for watching videos. The on-screen controls are also a lot more intuitive, with shortcuts to your smart home devices and your favorite YouTube videos. The sunrise alarm on the Nest Hub is also more customizable. You can have the screen gradually brighten just like the Smart Clock, but you can also have it so that a soothing “pre-alarm” sound plays as the sunrise alarm begins. If you have smart lights installed, you can have those lights gradually brighten as well. Last but not least, you can adjust the sunrise alarm window anywhere from five to 30 minutes. Buy Google Nest Hub at Best Buy - $90 Amazon Echo Show 5 Engadget If you happen to use other Amazon products like Ring cameras or Alexa-powered microwave ovens, the Echo Show 5 might be a better choice. The screen is bright and colorful, it has a stylish streamlined design, and it can display photographs just like the Nest Hub. It can also play videos from sources such as Hulu and Amazon Prime Video, and it has a built-in browser for surfing the web. Unlike the Nest Hub, the Echo Show 5 does have a camera, which might be disconcerting if you don’t want a camera by your bedside. At the same time, this does mean the Echo Show 5 is capable of video calls, which the Nest Hub is not. The Echo Show 5 works nicely as an alarm clock, with several clock faces and the ability to tap the top of it to hit snooze. There’s a sunrise alarm feature as well, which slowly brightens the display 15 minutes before the set time. Unfortunately, the sunrise feature on the Echo Show is a bit more limited than its rivals, as it only works when the alarm is set between 4am and 9 am. But if that works for you and you’re an Alexa fan, the Echo Show 5 is worth considering. Buy Echo Show 5 at Amazon - $65 Other smart light choices Engadget Casper Glow The Casper Glow is a unique lighting device that can be programmed via a companion app to brighten at specific times just like a sunrise clock, except, well, there’s no clock at all. Plus, there aren’t any speakers, so it can’t play alarm sounds either. Instead, it’s really more of a portable smart lamp. It can also be used as a late-night reading light before bed. (It’ll gradually dim over 30 minutes.) Yet, the Glow does have several innovative features that make it stand out. The Glow is highly portable, and can be held easily in one hand. Turning it on or off is a matter of flipping it over. You can twist it clockwise or counterclockwise to adjust its brightness. At night you can lift it, give it a shake, and it’ll emit a soft glow that’s bright enough to guide you through a dark hallway. If you have two Casper Glow lights, you can have them synchronized to turn on or off at the same time. And, since it runs on rechargeable batteries, you can use it as emergency lights in the event of a blackout. The Glow is probably not a good choice if you need more than just a bright light to wake you up. But If you already have an existing alarm clock, or you just prefer using your phone for the alarm, the Glow could be a nice addition to your nightstand. Buy Glow Light at Casper - $130 Philips Hue smart lights Philips Programmable smart lights like the Philips Hue bulbs are another way to help you sleep and wake up a little more easily. Plus, certain white and color ambiance lights offer color temperatures that mimic natural light, which help you sleep more naturally. You can then set up routines within the companion app that will either slowly turn on the lights in the morning or gradually turn them off at night. Of course, the Philips Hue lights can be used in other lighting scenarios too; you can have them automatically come on at night or when you’re out of the house. Plus, Hue bulbs are compatible with nearly every smart assistant out there, so turning on or off the lights is as easy as telling Google, Alexa or Siri to do so. Buy Philips Hue smart lights set at Amazon - $180

    The very best budget robot vacuums you can purchase

    All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. We all could use a little help keeping our homes clean, and now we live in an age where robots are actually capable of lending a (mechanical) hand. Robot vacuums are some of the most recognizable smart home gadgets available today with their circular shapes and propensity for bumping into walls. While they provide an undeniable convenience, they can also have high price tags. It’s not unheard of to drop close to $1,000 on a high-end robo-vac. But unlike just a few years ago, today there are plenty of budget robot vacuum options to choose from. At Engadget, we consider anything under $300 to be cheap in this space and you may be surprised to see how many there are at that price point. And if you’re new to the world of robot vacuums, you may find that one of these budget gadgets does everything you expected and more. Are robot vacuums worth it? Friends and family often ask me if new gadgets are “worth it,” and when it comes to robot vacuum the answer is yes. The most important thing they have going for them is autonomy — just turn it on, walk away. If you’re someone who wants to spend as little time as possible cleaning your home — or just someone who detests vacuuming — then a semi-autonomous robot is a great investment. There are plenty of other good things about them that we’ll discuss in a bit, but let’s take a look at the biggest trade-offs when opting for a robot vacuum: less power, less capacity and less flexibility. The former two cons go hand in hand — robot vacuums are much smaller than upright vacuums, which leads to less suction. Also, they hold less dirt because their built-in bins are a fraction of the size of a standard vacuum canister or bag. Also, while robo-vacs are cord-free, that means they are slaves to their batteries and will require regular recharging. When it comes to flexibility, robot vacuums do things differently than standard ones. You can control some with your smartphone, set cleaning schedules and more, but robo-vacs are primarily tasked with cleaning floors. On the flip side, their upright counterparts can come with various attachments that let you clean couches, stairs, light fixtures and other hard to reach places. What to look for in a budget robot vacuum Valentina Palladino / Engadget When looking for a cheap robo-vac, one of the first things you should consider is WiFi connectivity. While you may think that’s a given on all smart home devices, it’s not. Some of the most affordable robo-vacs don’t have the option to connect to your home WiFi network. If you choose one like this, you won’t be able to control it with a smartphone app or with voice commands. Another feature that’s typically reserved for WiFi-connected robots is scheduling because most of them use a mobile app to set cleaning schedules. But WiFi-incapable vacuums usually come with remote controls that have all the basic functions that companion mobile apps do, including start, stop and return to dock. And if you’re concerned about the possibility of hacking, vacuums with no access to your WiFi network are the best option. You should also think about the types of floors you have in your home. Are they all carpet? Or mostly hardwood and tile? Carpets demand vacuums with more suction power that can collect debris that gets pushed down into nooks and crannies. Unfortunately, there isn’t a universal metric by which suction is measured. Some companies provide Pascal (Pa) levels and generally the higher the Pa, the stronger. But other companies don’t rely on Pa levels and simply say their robots have X-times more suction than other robot vacuums. So how can you ensure you’re getting a robot vacuum that will adequately clean your floors? Read the product description. Look for details about its ability to clean hardwood and carpets, and see if it has a “max” mode you can use to increase suction. If you are given a Pa measurement, look for around 2000Pa if you have mostly carpeted floors. Size is also important for two reasons: clearance and dirt storage. Check the specs for the robot’s height to see if it can get underneath the furniture you have in your home. Most likely any robot vacuum you find won’t be able to clean under a couch (unless it’s a very tall, very strange couch), but some can get under entryway tables, nightstands and the like. As for dirt storage, look out for the milliliter capacity of the robot’s dustbin — the bigger the capacity, the more dirt the vacuum can collect before you have to empty it. Object detection and cliff sensors are other key features to look out for. The former helps the robot vacuum navigate around furniture while it cleans, rather than mindlessly pushing its way into it. As for cliff sensors, these prevent robot vacuums from taking a tumble down your stairs and they are a must-have if you have a multi-level home. The best budget robot vacuums Best overall: $250 Shark Ion RV761 Valentina Palladino / Engadget It was harder to name a best budget robot vacuum than I anticipated because many of the machines I tested were pretty solid. However, two in particular stood out a bit from the crowd — the Shark’s Ion RV761 and iRobot’s Roomba 694, and Shark’s device ended up besting the Roomba in a few areas: price, battery life and cleaning modes. Buy Shark Ion RV761 at Best Buy - $250 The Shark RV761 comes in at $250 and includes two extra side brushes and one extra filter in the box. Not only is that a great price for the vacuum alone, but those included extra parts increase the amount of time you have before you have to shell out more money to keep the vacuum working properly. Unfortunately, the robot’s design doesn’t do it any favors — it has a bowling-shirt vibe that I can’t get over. But I applaud its clearly labeled buttons, something many other robot vacuums don’t have. No obtuse icons here, just easy to read text for Clean, Dock and Max (the latter referring to the high-powered clean mode). You could rely just on the buttons, but it also connects to WiFi so you can use the Shark Clean app. I had no trouble connecting the Shark to my home WiFi network by following the in-app instructions, and I even got to name it before the setup was complete (Sharkey — I know, very original). It makes as much noise as I’d expect a robot vacuum to — loud enough that I had to up the volume of the podcast I was listening to, but not loud enough for me to hear it when it was cleaning a different room down the hall. I live in a mid-sized New York apartment, so “down the hall” really isn’t all that far away. Surprisingly, switching to Max mode didn’t dramatically increase the noise level either. The Shark doesn’t have a spot-clean feature, but Max mode is good to use when you have a specific area that needs a lot of attention. I gave Max mode a shot a few times, but I found the standard cleaning mode did a good enough job of inhaling dirt, debris, crumbs and even the cat hair embedded in my carpets. I also appreciated the Shark’s adjustable wheels, which raise and lower automatically depending on the “terrain” and the obstacles in its path. I first noticed the wheels when the Shark ran over my cat’s nearly 1-inch thick toy mouse, something that most other robot vacuums just push around as they move. The mouse was unharmed, just a little squished after the encounter, and the Shark avoided sucking up any of my cat’s other toys, too (even if it did push her T-shaped play tunnel around the living room incessantly). Valentina Palladino / Engadget The Shark has proximity sensors like many other machines do, which help them avoid collisions. But in my experience, very few robot vacuums are actually good at doing this — they often bump into walls and furniture, readjust and move on. What sets robot vacuums apart is their ability to avoid getting stuck, or least get unstuck quickly. The Shark was just ok at this — it was tripped up by a display case that had just enough space in between its legs that the robot tried to get underneath it, but alas, failed every time. The robot ran for an hour and a half on average in its standard cleaning mode. That’s right in line with the company’s estimated battery life, and more often than not, the Shark returned to its dock fairly quickly when it was getting low on battery. Only once did I actually have to pick up the machine and set it on its charger. Usually, I used the Shark Clean companion app. The homepage lets you start and stop cleanings as well as switch to Max mode and “find” the robot, which just forces the machine to beep loud enough that you’ll (hopefully) hear it from across your home. You can also see how long the device has been cleaning when it’s mid-job and a full cleaning history, which is helpful to check out if you forgot the last time you ran the vacuum. In the app menu, you’ll find the scheduling feature, which lets you choose recurring days and times for regular cleanings. Ultimately, Shark’s RV761 did everything I expected a good robot vacuum to do and did them well. For a semi-autonomous device, small details — like reliable WiFi connectivity, good battery life and a well designed app — can make or break your experience. While there were a few small hiccups along the way, they didn’t overshadow the fact that the Shark RV761 provides a ton of value for only $250. Runner up: $300 iRobot Roomba 694 Valentina Palladino / Engadget iRobot’s new Roomba 694 comes close to the Shark RV671. At $300, this model will eventually replace the Roomba 675 but, aside from an updated exterior, it’s fundamentally the same vacuum. I much prefer this robot’s all-black design to that of the Shark and it looks better than older Roomba models, too. It has three physical buttons on it — start, dock and spot — and, like the Shark, it connects to WiFi so you can control it via the iRobot app. Unfortunately, your $300 gets you the vacuum and its necessary parts only so you’ll have to pay up immediately when you need a replacement filter or brushes. Buy Roomba 694 at iRobot - $300 Setting up the Roomba 694 is much like the Shark machine — open the companion app and follow the instructions. Once it’s connected to your home WiFi network, you’re able to use the app to control the vacuum whenever you don’t feel like using the physical buttons. However, the spot-clean function is only available as a button, which is a bit of a bummer considering I expected the app to mirror the buttons while adding even more customizable controls. iRobot’s app is a bit better than Shark’s. Now, there’s nothing wrong with the Shark Clean app — it’s reliable and easy to use. But iRobot’s app puts most pertinent controls on the homepage, so you rarely (if ever) need to navigate through its menu to do things like set a cleaning schedule. Overall, it’s a bit more polished than Shark’s app and that might be best for less tech-savvy people. But simplicity can be tricky. The overall iRobot user experience is incredibly straightforward and some will prefer that over a more complicated setup. But customization and flexibility are sacrificed to achieve that. I was a bit shocked to see the features other robot vacuums have that iRobot machines don’t. Direction controls are a good example — believe it or not, most higher-end robot vacuums can’t be controlled like toy cars. But some like the Anker Eufy vacuum has them on its physical remote, and Roborock’s E4 vacuum has digital direction controls in the Mi Home app. The Roomba 694 may not have a ton of bells and whistles, but it gets the job done and does so without you needing to tend to it. It’s on par with the Shark robot in terms of cleaning but it generally only ran for around 45 minutes before needing to dock and recharge. iRobot says run times will vary based on floor surfaces, but the 694 is estimated to have a 90-minute battery life when cleaning hard floors. Regardless, it’s more than a half hour less than Shark’s robot. While 45 minutes may be enough time for the robot to scuttle around most rooms in my apartment, those with larger homes may have to wait for it to recharge in order to clean everywhere. iRobot has made a name for itself in the autonomous vacuum market for good reason. It’s machines are polished, dead simple to use and the accompanying app is excellent. That ease of use (and the reputation of the iRobot name) comes at a slightly higher price tag, which many will be willing to pay. But there are plenty of solid options now that didn’t exist even just three years ago. Best bang for your buck: $230 Anker Eufy RoboVac 11S Valentina Palladino / Engadget Anker’s $230 Eufy RoboVac 11S was one of the cheapest vacuums I tested but it also proved to be one of the most versatile. First thing to note: this robot vacuum doesn’t have WiFi, but it does come with a remote that gives you most of the functions you’d find in an app (including a schedule feature). Eufy also includes additional brushes and filters in the box. Buy Eufy RoboVac 11S at Amazon - $150 The “S” in this robot’s name stands for slim, and it’s roughly 0.5-inches thinner than all of the other vacuums I tested. Not only does this make the 11S lighter, but it was the only one that could clean under my entryway table. The 11S has a physical on-off toggle on its underside plus one button on its top that you can press to start a cleaning. It always begins in auto mode, which optimizes the cleaning process as it putters around your home, but you can use the remote to select specific modes like spot and edge clean. I ended up repeatedly using the 11S’ spot clean feature. My partner’s main hobby involves a lot of craft supplies and usually results in tiny pieces of scrap paper all over the floor. The 11S cleaned them up well when in spot-clean mode which focuses its suction in one area as it spins outward in a spiral. I didn’t even have to pick up and move the 11S to the paper-strewn location either — the remote’s direction buttons let me drive the vacuum almost like an RC car. The 11S has three power modes — Standard, BoostIQ and Max — and I kept mine on BoostIQ most of the time. It provided enough suction to adequately clean my carpeted floors, missing only a few crumbs or pieces of debris in corners or tight spaces around furniture. It ran for roughly one hour and fifteen minutes when in BoostIQ mode and it has remarkable collision avoidance. Sure, it bumped into walls and some large pieces of furniture, but it was the only vacuum that I tried to consistently avoid hitting my cat’s play tunnel that lives in the middle of our living room floor. As far as noise levels go, you can definitely hear the difference between BoostIQ and Max, but none of the three settings is abhorrently loud. In fact, I could barely hear the 11S when it was on the opposite end of my apartment running in BoostIQ mode. Thankfully, error alert beeps were loud enough to let me know when something went awry, like the 11S accidentally getting tripped up by a rogue charging cable (which only happened a couple of times and neither robot nor cable were harmed in the process). Overall, the Eufy RoboVac 11S impressed me with its smarts, despite its lack of WiFi. The lack of wireless connectivity is arguably the worst thing about the robot and that’s saying a lot. It’s worth mentioning that this model is rated for up to 1300Pa suction, but you can grab the next model up, the RoboVac 11S Max, which gives you 2000Pa suction (just know that it’ll likely be louder as a result). But you can’t argue with the value of the $230 11S — especially when it’s often on sale for around $150.

    ICYMI: We review Samsung’s improved Galaxy Chromebook 2

    All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. This week we got our hands on Samsung’s new Galaxy Chromebook 2, and Nathan Ingraham details the ways that the new model makes significant improvements over last year's laptop. Also, Steve Dent takes another look at the Canon EOS R5 to see how firmware upgrades have fixed the cameras overheating problems. Lastly, I used an online sleep training system to see if it could help my twins sleep better, and got some pretty positive results. Nathan Ingraham / Engadget Although the new Galaxy Chromebook 2 looks much the same as its predecessor, Samsung made some internal changes that make this a better laptop for more people. The body of the Chromebook 2 is slightly bigger at 13.9mm thick and 2.7 pounds, but Nathan Ingraham said it both feels well-made and light enough to easily carry around all day. The new model eschews the previous stylus, camera on the keyboard deck, and fingerprint sensor — and Samsung changed the display resolution from 4K to 1080p. Nathan said that didn’t impact the quality of the screen, which still looked outstanding with bright and saturated colors and solid viewing angles. One of the biggest upgrades was battery life: the Chromebook 2 lasted an impressive 11 hours and 49 minutes in testing, compared to the paltry 5 hours and 11 minutes he got out of last year’s model. Still, he said he wished it would last an hour or two longer. Overall though, Nathan felt that the Chromebook 2 was much easier to recommend, and not just because of the upgrades, but also because the new model has a lower price of $699. Now if they could just do something about that giant promotional sticker on the palm rest.... Owlet Every new parent has one common question: How can I get my baby to sleep better? To answer that, Owlet — the company that makes the smart sock monitor — has Dream Lab, an online sleep training system that helps parents teach their children healthy, consistent sleeping habits. A series of assessments and questionnaires will match your child with one of three methods to use to help them learn to self-soothe. The program also offers videos that give step-by-step instructions, motivational advice and information on sleep training. I tried out the program with my infant twins, and saw some immediate improvements — even though I admittedly did not follow the system as strictly as I should have. I liked the way the system was tailored to my babies needs, and after trying the “Stay” method noticed the children sleeping more soundly, for longer periods and with fewer overnight wakings. However, I would have preferred to see the service available as part of Owlet’s existing app, as opposed to a separate, less convenient website. Steve Dent/Engadget When Canon initially released the EOS R5 and R6, the feedback was overwhelmingly positive. The EOS R5 offered 8K 4K 120p video, accurate autofocus, fantastic image stabilization and sharp images. Steve Dent also liked the way the full-frame mirrorless camera handled during shoots. However, the R5 suffered from overheating issues, which disappointed many fans. In response, Canon has released firmware updates that have improved — but not entirely solved — the heat problems. Steve still experienced a few hiccups while shooting video: he was able to shoot in 8K for roughly 25-30 minutes before he needed to stop because the camera got too hot. But he pointed out that it also recovers more quickly now, so when he was able to shoot for a few minutes at a time and shut down the camera between takes, he was able to keep the camera running for several hours without issue. Despite the heat challenges, Steve said he really likes the $3,900 EOS R5 as it’s the only pure, high-megapixel hybrid camera that does both photography and video equally well.

    Owlet Dream Lab review: Can a sleep coaching program help my kids?

    All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. By 5:41am I can already tell it’s going to be a bad day, mostly because my twins have taken turns waking me up every 20 minutes since 3:17am. I alternate between the two babies until 5am when I’m able to get almost a whole half hour of rest before they wake again. I feel like a dying neon sign: flickering and buzzing and attempting to function properly. I can’t focus. I’m short-tempered. I cry at least twice before lunch. There’s a reason that sleep deprivation is used as a torture technique. Not every night is as hard as that one was. In general, we’ve reached an uneasy truce in my household when it comes to the kids' naps and bedtimes. We more or less stick to a schedule, and they generally don’t take more than 15 minutes to fall asleep at night. But, they don’t always stay asleep, their naps are probably shorter than they should be, and I know I’m getting them into some bad habits by cuddling and rocking them back to sleep. We could be doing better, and since I didn’t know where to start I decided to sign up for the Dream Lab sleep coaching system. Dream Lab is affiliated with Owlet, the company that makes the Smart Sock which monitors a baby’s heart rate and respirations during sleep. The Dream Lab system was developed by two pediatric sleep consultants, Jill Spivack and Jen Waldburger, who have helped over 500,000 families establish healthy sleep patterns with their children. The service is Owlet’s only software product, and while you can purchase a code to unlock it for $100 from several different places, the program itself is only available via the Owlet website. It consists of assessments and questionnaires to see where your child is having sleep difficulties, plus instructional videos and three different training options to use with your child. It’s not a “cry it out” type of program, but does point out that a few tears during the process are likely unavoidable. What is sleep training? For those who are unfamiliar, sleep training is the general concept of teaching a baby to fall asleep on their own without intervention from a parent or caretaker. That means no rocking, cuddling, walking, swinging, nursing or feeding. This not only teaches a child how to soothe themselves, but it also helps them learn how to fall back asleep when they wake in the middle of the night. There are dozens of schools of thought on this — new parents will likely hear the phrase “let them cry it out” more than once — but they’re all basically centered around getting a baby to sleep consistently and soundly through the night. These techniques are sometimes combined with sleep weaning, which is moving your child away from waking at night to eat. Either way, the goal is for everyone to be getting more sleep. The Dream Lab process in action Owlet The first step of the Dream Lab process is to assess your child's health and sleep habits. This consists of nine questions, including things like “Is your child currently cutting a tooth through the gum?” and “How are you feeding your child?” When I enter in the answers for my daughter, who is both teething and close to walking on her own, I’m told that this may not be the right time to start a sleep training program since she is both irritable about the tooth and excited about her new skills. Fair enough. Although this is disappointing, as she’s the one who requires the most help, it’s also entirely understandable and gives me some trust in the process. It makes sense that a child who is suffering from intermittent pain, or who is developing new skills, would struggle with sleep training. Dream Lab allows users of the program to come back once circumstances are more conducive to success. Since I have twins, I instead took an assessment for my son, who qualified. The next page showed a video to help me understand when to start the sleep training process. After that, I answered another questionnaire for the “Sleep Stealer” section, which consisted of an additional nine questions about my kid’s sleep habits, from what he wears to sleep and what’s in his crib, to the temperature and darkness level of the room. The next step was to answer another set of questions to determine which method (Visit, Stay or Touch) would be the best fit. I wind up matching with the Stay method, which is the one I would have chosen regardless. The results of the Sleep Stealer questionnaire are broken down into 17 suggested actions across five categories (e.g., Sleep Environment, Routines and Sleep Schedule). Some of the suggestions were for things I already do, like creating a consistent wind-down routine ahead of bed time. Some of the other suggestions are straightforward enough, like leaving the white noise machine on throughout the night or keeping the room warmer. Others — say, putting my son in a room alone while he’s sleep training — aren’t practical or would be difficult to accomplish. The only other room in our house where his crib could go has a broken window and gets way too cold, so I left that to-do undone. Despite not marking all the items as complete, the site still lets me progress to the next step: a series of coaching videos that gives step-by-step instructions on how to start with the Stay method. There are additional videos covering topics like naps or separation anxiety, and each one has a summary you can click on for more information. After I watched the videos I was taken to my son’s Sleep Plan, which detailed a daily schedule of when to start a wind-down routine, nap times and a schedule to wean him off of night feeds. The plan includes a page for each day, and places for me to enter in details as I go on what time he was put in his crib, how long it took him to fall asleep, etc. Each day’s briefing also includes a video from the trainers to help motivate me to keep going. Does sleep training work? Owlet If I were grading my kids on their progress in the Dream Lab program, I’d give them an A-. They’re older than most babies who start sleep training so they took quickly to a lot of the techniques. And after a few days , they went to sleep faster, with less intervention from me, and stayed asleep longer. They also were easier to put back to sleep when they woke up in the middle of the night. However, if I were grading myself on how well I did on the program, I’d get a D at best. I can’t lie here, I did not follow the program to the letter — and the Dream Lab coaches are very specific about how important it is to fully comply with the recommendations. Some of the places where I failed were the Sleep Stealer suggestions. Honestly, I don’t really have a good place to isolate a child who is sleep training so my son stayed where he normally slept: in the crib by my bed, in the same room as his sister. Of the 17 action items in the Sleep Stealer section, I ignored three. But I also didn’t follow all of the step-by-step instructions for the Stay method either. In order to sleep train with as few tears as possible, the method calls for me to stay in the room while the babies cry and check in with them intermittently — but not to touch them, rock them or otherwise assist. I failed there. I adjusted the method somewhat, so that my check-ins included placing them on their backs in their cribs, giving them a pacifier and tucking them in with a blanket (another thing which is not allowed in the program). While this is not at all what I was supposed to do, I tried to keep my interactions to a minimum, and it generally worked. I also reverted to briefly holding them at night when they woke up, before putting them back down. Again, this still worked most of the time and was an improvement from the nights where I spent hours walking across the room holding them. As far as I can tell, we’re still making progress — albeit more slowly than we might have had we strictly adhered to the program. While the Dream Lab system is intended to make sure that you’re as ready for the sleep training as your child is, with plenty of energy and time to dedicate to establishing a routine and sticking to the plan, I found it difficult to be that precise with it. Not only because I have twins, but because I work a full-time job from home, during a pandemic, in a rather remote location. My days are pure chaos, and something like a Sunday afternoon drive or a migraine do a stellar job of derailing the sort of strict routine that Dream Lab requires. Wrap-up Owlet There are a million different sleep coaching systems and YouTube videos and Instagram influencers who will offer advice on how to get your child to sleep better. Having never tried a sleep training program before, and having scant time to do intensive research, I would be totally willing to pay the $100 entry fee to receive some direction. It helped that the system asks specific questions ensuring the program is tailored to my children’s needs. That being said, I had a few quibbles about the overall process. First, I wasn’t sure exactly how to proceed exactly given that I have twins. There’s a section on the Help Center page about multiples, but it didn’t answer all of my questions and I didn’t really want to wait one or two days for a reply from the web form. For example, what if my son and daughter matched with different methods? I had other questions too: Does weaning from night time feeds include the 9pm one as well as the midnight? This is maybe the one time I really would have liked to see a chat box for more immediate replies. Also, on more than one occasion I wished that the program was available as part of Owlet’s existing app. Because it is only available as a web page, I had to catch up on my entries for each day’s activity — particularly over the weekend, when I rarely open my computer. I also had to refresh the page often as it had timed out, and on at least one occasion, I had to log in again. It’s not the biggest issue, obviously, but given that Owlet’s other products can all be grouped in the app, it would have been nice to have this one there too. As to whether or not you should try Dream Lab’s sleep system, I’ll tell you that like a lot of coaching programs, you’re only going to get out of it what you put in. But I’m not disappointed by the experience, and I’m going to continue to use it with my twins because I’ve seen really positive results. Having my children fall asleep easier, and stay asleep longer, has been well worth the price of the program already. I’m just going to adjust their time table to one that’s a bit more achievable for my house hold right now.

    All of the real methods to watch the Super Bowl

    All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Super Bowl 55 will occur this Sunday between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Kansas City Chiefs. NFL's biggest event of the year is a television phenomenon that goes beyond just sports, be it million-dollar-commercials, the half-time concert or just an excuse to chow down on chicken wings. It used to be that the only way to watch was to either have a cable or satellite subscription, or venture out to your local sports bar (Remember bars?). Fortunately, you now have a plethora of viewing options, including ways to stream. Where and when? Super Bowl 2021 will take place at the Raymond James Stadium in Tampa Bay, Florida on February 7th. The kick-off time is set for 6:30pm ET / 3:30pm PT. It'll be televised on CBS as well as ESPN Deportes in Spanish.  How to watch with cable or satellite TV Obviously, if you subscribe to either cable or satellite, you'll have no problem watching the Super Bowl this Sunday on your TV. This is good news if you'd rather not bother with signing up for a service online, or if you have a spotty internet connection. How to stream the Super Bowl Cord-cutters have plenty of ways to watch the big game this Sunday. One of them is through a live TV streaming service, as long as it carries CBS. Thankfully, a lot of them do. YouTube TV ($65 a month), AT&T TV ($70-plus a month) and Fubo TV ($65-plus a month) all include CBS. Alternately, you can also watch the game through CBS All Access (starting at $6 a month), whose name is changing next month to Paramount Plus.  If you don't currently subscribe to any of these services and want to watch the game for free, you can sign up to one for a seven-day free trial period just to watch the game, and then cancel afterward. The one exception here is AT&T TV, which currently doesn’t offer free trials.  We should note, however, that those with Hulu with Live TV ($65 a month) might be out of luck, as Hulu has lost the distribution rights to a number of CBS affiliates late last year. Similarly, Sling TV doesn’t have CBS in its lineup.  Jamie Squire via Getty Images If you don't have pay-TV or a streaming service What if you don’t want to sign up for pay TV or a streaming service? You're in luck: You can watch the Super Bowl this Sunday too, thanks to a few different livestreams. You can watch the game for free on CBSSports.com as well as through the CBS Sports app, which is accessible via your phone or through a streaming device such as Roku, Fire TV, Apple TV or Google TV.  You can also watch the game through the NFL app or the Yahoo Sports app. (Yahoo is owned by Engadget's parent company, Verizon.) Of course, you could also use an indoor antenna with your TV to simply watch the free over-the-air broadcast.  International viewers can use NFL's international game pass streaming service, which has a seven-day free trial. If you’d rather not go through that, however, check out this guide to see if your country has a local Super Bowl broadcast partner.  What about 4K? Last year, Fox made history by broadcasting the Super Bowl in 4K and HDR for the first time (it was still shot in 1080p and HDR, but was upscaled to 4K in the broadcast). However, that is not an option this year because CBS Sports is at the helm and has less experience with 4K broadcasts. CBS Sports also cited “production limitations” caused by COVID-19 as a reason why it couldn’t broadcast the game in 4K. 

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