Thursday, January 20, 2022

God of War or Red Dead II? Drafting The Best Games Of 2018

Click to watch embedded media While the internet may be more familiar with fantasy sports such as football or baseball, that doesn't mean the gamers of the world can't have a little fun too. From God of War to Red Dead Redemption II and everything in between, join Game Informer as we pick the best games of 2018 and form the ultimate fantasy teams. But how does the process work? The panel of Ben Reeves, John Carson, Kim Wallace, Alex Stadnik, and Alex Van Aken have assembled to select five games apiece from 2018 to create the most robust roster possible. After randomizing the draft order, each person will have time to decide. At the end of the round, the order reverses, and the fun continues from the fifth person back to the first. Sounds pretty standard, right? You can fill your list with as many great games as possible and create the video game equivalent of the 1990s Chicago Bulls. That's where you're wrong. If you've played fantasy sports before, you're well aware that picking players in the late rounds can get rough. In that spirit, each panel member in today's video must select one title off Metacritic's list of the worst games of 2018. In a year of such high highs, it's incredible how low the lows can get. But why are we drafting games like this? Just for fun? Why no, for the community validation, of course! That's right, folks. You get to vote on who has the strongest list. Be sure to head over to our Discord to select the editor with the strongest list, and we'll read the results on this week's episode of The GI Show! Thank you so much for your participation and please let us know what you thought of the segment in the comments below!
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    Facebook is testing sticker ads in Stories

    Facebook is offering creators more options to make money from their audiences. One method it’s testing is a way to make bank from Stories. Some creators will be able to plug ads that look similar to stickers into their Stories and they'll get a cut of ad revenue. For instance, creators might plug local businesses with a sticker while they're on trips. Only a small number of creators have access to this option during the initial test, but Facebook hopes to roll out the feature in the near future. It also plans to enable the feature for all short-form videos. Elsewhere, Facebook is bringing mid-roll ads to shorter videos. Until now, ads were only present in videos that were at least three minutes long. You may start to see ads in videos that run for only a minute. Videos lasting between one and three minutes can have ads 30 seconds in. Ads can appear in longer videos after 45 seconds, down from one minute. Pages will only be able to run ads on shorter videos if they meet certain requirements, like having 600,000 minutes of total watch time in the previous 60 days and at least five active video uploads. Live video creators additionally need to have at least 60,000 minutes of live watch time over the same period to qualify for ads in their streams. Facebook Facebook is also expanding paid live events to another 24 countries and switching on fan subscriptions in 10 more regions. In addition, it's spending $7 million to promote the Stars virtual tipping currency. As with Twitch Bits, users can send these to creators. Facebook will be giving away Stars during certain live streams. Comments that users send with Stars will be more prominently displayed on streams. You'll be able to send virtual gifts to creators too. Stars will be available in more markets, and you can check on a creator support site whether your Page is eligible. Soon, Facebook will expand Stars beyond live streams by testing them in on-demand videos. Meanwhile, Facebook has updated the minimum eligibility criteria for gaming creators to become partners and unlock more features and monetization options.

    Apple won’t collect fees on paid Facebook events until 2021

    Sponsored Links Facebook Last month, Facebook and Apple clashed over App Store fees. Now, Apple seems to be easing up slightly. Businesses that host paid online events through Facebook on iOS will be able to keep all of their earnings (minus taxes), Facebook announced today. Apple will not collect its usual 30 percent commission on in-app purchases, but there are a few conditions. As you might remember, this summer, Facebook announced a new feature that allows businesses and creators to charge for online events hosted on the platform. Facebook said it wouldn’t collect fees from the events “for at least the next year.” But Facebook couldn’t convince Apple to waive its 30 percent fee or allow iOS users to use Facebook Pay, so that Facebook could absorb the costs for businesses. Facebook spoke out against Apple and its App Store fees. Now, Apple has agreed to let Facebook Pay process all paid online event purchases. This means Facebook can absorb the cost, and Apple won’t get a cut. But this agreement only lasts until December 31st. “Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will have to, yet again, pay Apple the full 30 percent App Store tax,” a Facebook spokesperson said. Facebook will not collect fees until August 2021. The other big catch is that Facebook Gaming creators are left out of the deal. They’ll still have to hand over 30 percent of earnings that come through the iOS app. “Apple’s decision to not collect its 30 percent tax on paid online events comes with a catch: gaming creators are excluded from using Facebook Pay in paid online events on iOS,” said Vivek Sharma, VP of Facebook Gaming. “We unfortunately had to make this concession to get the temporary reprieve for other businesses.” These battles over App Store fees are becoming more common. Sometimes they go better than others. Epic is now embroiled in a nasty legal battle with Apple, but Basecamp found a way to skirt Apple’s rules to get its Hey email app approved. Just yesterday, Epic, Spotify and others announced The Coalition for App Fairness, an alliance formed to pressure Apple and Google to change their app store rules. In this article: facebook, facebook gaming, apple, app store, fees, in-app purchases, iap, commission, waive, facebook pay, small businesses, online events, creators, news, gear, gaming All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 59 Shares Share Tweet Share

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