Monday, October 25, 2021

CD Projekt Acquires The Molasses Flood, The Studio Behind The Flame In The Flood

CD Projekt has announced that it has acquired The Molasses Flood, the studio known for games like The Flame in the Flood and Drake Hollow.  This news comes by way of a press release from CD Projekt that says The Molasses Flood is a perfect fit for the studio group. The studio will be working on one of CD Projekt’s IP, although it will retain its own identity and won’t merge with any existing teams in CD Projekt.  “The Molasses Flood will be working in close cooperation with CD Projekt Red, but will keep their current identity and will not be merged with existing teams,” the release reads. “The studio will be working on its own ambitious project which is based on one of CD Projekt’s IPs. Details about the project will be announced in the future.”  CD Projekt specifically cites The Molasses Flood’s technological insight and experience as reasons for the acquisition. “We’re always on the lookout for teams who make games with heart,” CD Projekt president and CEO Adam Kiciński writes in the press release. “The Molasses Flood share our passion for video game development, they’re experienced, quality-oriented, and have great technological insight. I’m convinced they will bring a lot of talent and determination to the Group.”  The Molasses Flood’s studio head, Forrest Dowling, says the studio saw an incredible opportunity in becoming part of the CD Projekt group, which is also the home of CD Projekt Red, the team behind The Witcher series and Cyberpunk 2077. Dowling says The Molasses Flood’s acquisition by CD Projekt will allow the team to reach a much wider audience.  While waiting for more details on The Molasses Flood’s next project, check out Game Informer’s The Flame in the Flood review and then check out our Cyberpunk 2077 review. 
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