Friday, September 17, 2021

Why Deathloop Is A Game Of The Year Contender – GI Show (Feat. James Willems)

Click to watch embedded media Welcome back to The Game Informer Show! This week, we're breaking down Blake Hester's Deathloop review impressions and why Arkane Studios has a Game of the Year contender on its hands. We also discuss Dying Light 2 delay news and Eastward, a charming pixel art game. On top of that, we're joined by the one and only James Willems, Co-Founder of Funhaus, to talk about his journey through the video game industry and hear more about his recent voice acting role in Psychonauts 2 and what it was like working with Double Fine.  Follow the crew on Twitter: Alex Stadnik (@Studnik76), Alex Van Aken (@itsVanAken), Marcus Stewart (@MarcusStewart7), Dan Tack (@DanTack), and special guest James Willems (@JamesWillems). The Game Informer Show is a weekly gaming podcast covering the latest video game news, industry topics, exclusive reveals, and reviews. Join hosts Alex Stadnik and Alex Van Aken every Thursday to chat about your favorite games – past and present – with Game Informer staff, developers, and special guests from all around the industry. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app. Check out the timestamps below to jump to a particular point in the discussion: 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:03:19 – James Willems Intro 00:19:56 – Dying Light 2 Delay 00:29:23 – Deathloop 00:52:40 – Eastward 01:00:58 – Psychonauts 2 01:03:17 – Gloomhaven Video Game 01:10:03 – The Artful Escape 01:13:57 – Housekeeping 01:18:43 – Community Emails News: Dying Light 2 Delayed To February Dying Light 2 Delayed To 2022 New Dying Light 2 Gameplay Shows Off Impressive Parkour During Gamescom 2021 Topic Of The Show: Why Deathloop Is A Game Of The Year Contender After years of waiting, Deathloop is finally out. The game follows protagonist Colt Vahn as he journeys across the island of Blackreef to break the time loop he is stuck in. The loop repeats itself at the end of every day, and Colt quickly learns that he will have to eliminate the island's eight leaders to escape. Deathloop is a game about learning your enemy's patterns, and it then requires you to exploit them for knowledge and, ultimately, victory. Blake Hester, Alex Van Aken, and Marcus Stewart have an in-depth discussion about why the game is worth playing. Check out our Deathloop review here. The Playlist: Game Informer Staff discuss the games they're playing. Fall is almost here, and with it comes myriad game releases. Dan Tack is here to share his Eastward review impressions and talks about the game's excellent worldbuilding. Next up is special guest James Willems to discuss his love for both Psychonauts 2 (who would have thought?) and his time playing the video game version of the Gloomhaven board game! Finally, Marcus gives us a quick lowdown on what he's playing, including The Artful Escape, the gorgeous indie that features some big Hollywood names! Listener Questions: The Game Informer crew answers your burning questions. This week we're talking about what titles we'd love to lend our voices to, which iconic character would slay at the Met Gala, and the unexpected way we found a video game! Thanks to everyone who submitted questions and Heat Map submissions! We'll be getting to your hot takes in the next few weeks and spacing out each episode. Read their questions below, or submit your own via the Official Game Informer Community Discord or by emailing us at [email protected]:  This question is for James. Are there any other game series that you are passionate about and would like to play a role in similar to Psychonauts? - Carlos Mora (Twitter) Wassup GI show, hope y’all’s having a swaggin week. Got a question about the show. The rich and famous dressed up as their favorite cereal at the Met Gala this year. Others used the limelight to draw attention to a cause of their choice. But I want to know which game characters would be invited to the Gala and what they’d wear to the show. Who do you think would slay? - AnAttackCorgi (Discord) Recently, for the first time ever, I borrowed a video game from the public library while picking up books for the kids. It was Kingdom Come Deliverance, a game I had been hesitant about buying given the mixed reviews. I like it, so I bought it! What is an odd/unexpected way you discovered a game that you liked. Thanks and good luck with the new podcast format! - Phil from Ottawa, Canada
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    iOS doesn’t have to be similar to Android, it requires more Google just

    Apple’s iOS 14 has taken some heat for copying Android features. The most obvious example being the new customizable widgets (iOS had widgets before, but it was limited to the left-most screen of the main menu). Another big change is the introduction of the App Library, a decluttered app screen that’s suspiciously similar to Android’s app drawer. There are other changes, too, such as a discreet view for Siri that won’t take over your whole display, and a new picture-in-picture mode. And yes, these are features that we’ve seen on Android as well. But for me, the real star of iOS 14 is not quite so obvious (It’s so low-key that Apple didn’t mention it at its WWDC keynote). It’s the fact that, at long last, iOS now lets you pick your own default email and browser apps. This one feature, more than any other, is what I feel is a key factor in preventing me from switching to Android. That’s because, as an iOS user, it is not Android that I find attractive -- it’s Google. Even though I’ve used several Android handsets over the years, I’ve always stuck with an iPhone. For one thing, I’m so invested in the ecosystem at this point (I’ve purchased many apps, several of which are iOS-only) that switching to another platform would be too painful.  But the main reason that I still have an iPhone, despite the many advantages of Android, is simply force of habit. Its interface, design language and keyboard feel so much like second nature that I can’t get used to anything else. This is a huge reason why Android’s widgets and home screens simply don’t appeal to me: I just never saw the need for them. Even now, after I’ve installed iOS 14, I haven’t bothered adding a widget or cleaning up my home screen, because I just like it the way it is. I suspect many other iOS users feel the same.  Chesnot via Getty Images For me, the main benefit that Android has over iOS has never been its design or its interface or anything like that. The main advantages with Android, in my view, are the features. Specifically, its compatibility with Google’s apps and services. That’s because, as much as I like iOS, Google is the world in which I live. I use Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Maps, Google Photos and Chrome literally every day. I find Google services easier and more pleasant to use, and I like that it all syncs together. The fact that Android comes with Gmail, Chrome and all the usual Google services by default, working seamlessly with a single sign-on, is great. That hasn’t been the case with iOS, and one can certainly understand why. Apple obviously wants you to use its own apps and services over the competition. Sure, third-party apps like Gmail and Chrome have been around for a few years now but there were always certain restrictions. The biggest hassle is that tapping on an email link in an app or in Safari would often kick me over the default Apple Mail app rather than Gmail (If you tapped on an email link in the Chrome app, it does let you go to Gmail however). Now, thanks to iOS 14, this is no longer a problem.  Of course, it’s likely that Apple isn't allowing this in iOS 14 out of the goodness of its heart. Instead, it could be a tactical move. The company is already facing serious antitrust scrutiny as well as accusations that it holds an App Store monopoly, partially due to the 30 percent commission it charges developers (This is the basis of Epic’s recent legal battle with Apple). Perhaps, by ceding ground on default iOS apps, Apple could be heading off concerns that it holds a monopoly over that at the very least. It is not unlike when Microsoft was forced to unbundle Internet Explorer from Windows in 2009 due to European regulations.  Be that as it may, this could be a sign of greater things to come. It’s given me a glimmer of hope that other Google apps, like Calendar and Maps for example, could be given the default treatment too. Of course, there are many things that Android still does better than iOS, such as managing notifications, app permission handling, Live Transcribe, the ability to sideload apps not from an App Store, and more. But if all I get is greater access to Google’s apps and services while still keeping the phone I like, I’d be happy. In this article: Gmail, ios, iOS 14, Android, widgets, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 382 Shares Share Tweet Share

    Google server problems took out Gmail and other services briefly

    Sponsored Links Chesnot via Getty Images It feels unusual to see internet problems that aren’t related to someone trying to pre-order gaming equipment, but this evening users on the East and West coasts of the US experienced issues accessing Google services like Gmail, Google Docs, and even YouTube. As noted on trackers like DownDetector, the issue seemed to peak at about 9PM ET. Eventually Google’s server status updated to note the issue, and said it was resolved fully by around 10 PM. In a statement to Engadget, a Google Cloud spokesperson said “We experienced a short service disruption affecting several products including G Suite, and are now recovering.” We're very sorry for the outage, we know how critical these services are to everyone's lives. We're working on a postmortem to ensure this won't happen again. — Urs Hölzle (@uhoelzle) September 25, 2020 Urs Hölzle, the Senior Vice President for Technical Infrastructure at Google offered more detail in a tweet that was even retweeted by Google CEO Sundar Pichai. According to Hölzle, “A pool of servers that route traffic to application backends crashed, and users on that particular pool experienced the outage.” If you didn’t notice any disruption, then it’s because you weren’t connected to those particular servers, even as those who were experienced problems trying to turn in online homework, access their messages or get work done. In this article: Google, Gmail, G Suite, google cloud, outage, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 132 Shares Share Tweet Share

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