Sunday, April 11, 2021

LOCATING THE Real Magic Mike Competition Show Announced for HBO Max

Finding The Real Magic Mike competition show announced for HBO MaxHBO Max is diving into the Warner Bros. vault to expand its unscripted content as the streaming platform has ordered the new reality competition The Real Magic Mike to series, with film star Channing Tatum and director Steven Soderbergh attached to executive produce and is expected to debut later this year.RELATED: The Lost City of D: Channing Tatum & Sandra Bullock-led rom-com sets 2022 release“From box office hits to sold-out live shows, Magic Mike has proven to be a pop-culture juggernaut that continues to delight people across the globe,” Sarah Aubrey, Head of Original Content, HBO Max, said in a statement. “We’re excited to work with Channing, Steven and the team behind Magic Mike Live to continue this successful franchise that celebrates self-confidence and sexiness both inside and out.”The exhilarating and sexy series will transform a group of men into real-life Magic Mikes as 10 men who have ‘lost their magic’ will compete for the title. Like any competition show, participants will undergo a full-body evolution as they learn to perform spectacular routines and develop a new level of self-confidence through stripping. Many will think they have what it takes but only one man can be the Real Magic Mike. The winner will receive a cash prize and an opportunity to perform on the blockbuster Magic Mike Live stage in Las Vegas.Click here to watch the Channing Tatum-led film!“Magic Mike is one of Warner Bros.’ most iconic franchises,” Mike Darnell, President, Warner Bros. Unscripted Television, said in a statement “We couldn’t be more excited to be working with Channing, Steven and HBO Max on an all-new vision of this amazing and legendary brand. We’re looking forward to giving fans a front-row seat as we search the country for undiscovered talent.”Loosely based on Tatum’s early days as a stripper before making it in Hollywood, Magic Mike quickly became a box office hit in 2012 grossing over $167 million worldwide. After the release of Magic Mike XXL, Executive Producer Channing Tatum, along with founders Peter Kiernan, Reid Carolin, Steven Soderbergh, Greg Jacobs and Nick Wechsler partnered with producer Vincent Marini to introduce audiences to the groundbreaking entertainment experience MAGIC MIKE LIVE. The live show has expanded internationally since it’s Vegas launch and has played to sold-out audiences in London, Berlin and Australia. Tickets are currently on sale for the recently announced 2022 UK Arena Tour.RELATED: New to Stream: HBO Max’s April 2021 highlightsA nationwide casting search for The Real Magic Mike is currently underway. In addition to Tatum and Soderbergh, the series will be executive produced by Reid Carolin, Peter Kiernan, Gregory Jacobs, Nick Wechsler, Vincent Marini, Alycia Rossiter, Cassie Lambert Scalettar, Chris Culvenor, Paul Franklin, Wes Dening and David Tibballs alongside co-executive producer Kevin Boyer, with Eureka Productions and Warner Bros. Unscripted Television producing in association with Warner Horizon.
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    iOS doesn’t have to be similar to Android, it requires more Google just

    Apple’s iOS 14 has taken some heat for copying Android features. The most obvious example being the new customizable widgets (iOS had widgets before, but it was limited to the left-most screen of the main menu). Another big change is the introduction of the App Library, a decluttered app screen that’s suspiciously similar to Android’s app drawer. There are other changes, too, such as a discreet view for Siri that won’t take over your whole display, and a new picture-in-picture mode. And yes, these are features that we’ve seen on Android as well. But for me, the real star of iOS 14 is not quite so obvious (It’s so low-key that Apple didn’t mention it at its WWDC keynote). It’s the fact that, at long last, iOS now lets you pick your own default email and browser apps. This one feature, more than any other, is what I feel is a key factor in preventing me from switching to Android. That’s because, as an iOS user, it is not Android that I find attractive -- it’s Google. Even though I’ve used several Android handsets over the years, I’ve always stuck with an iPhone. For one thing, I’m so invested in the ecosystem at this point (I’ve purchased many apps, several of which are iOS-only) that switching to another platform would be too painful.  But the main reason that I still have an iPhone, despite the many advantages of Android, is simply force of habit. Its interface, design language and keyboard feel so much like second nature that I can’t get used to anything else. This is a huge reason why Android’s widgets and home screens simply don’t appeal to me: I just never saw the need for them. Even now, after I’ve installed iOS 14, I haven’t bothered adding a widget or cleaning up my home screen, because I just like it the way it is. I suspect many other iOS users feel the same.  Chesnot via Getty Images For me, the main benefit that Android has over iOS has never been its design or its interface or anything like that. The main advantages with Android, in my view, are the features. Specifically, its compatibility with Google’s apps and services. That’s because, as much as I like iOS, Google is the world in which I live. I use Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Maps, Google Photos and Chrome literally every day. I find Google services easier and more pleasant to use, and I like that it all syncs together. The fact that Android comes with Gmail, Chrome and all the usual Google services by default, working seamlessly with a single sign-on, is great. That hasn’t been the case with iOS, and one can certainly understand why. Apple obviously wants you to use its own apps and services over the competition. Sure, third-party apps like Gmail and Chrome have been around for a few years now but there were always certain restrictions. The biggest hassle is that tapping on an email link in an app or in Safari would often kick me over the default Apple Mail app rather than Gmail (If you tapped on an email link in the Chrome app, it does let you go to Gmail however). Now, thanks to iOS 14, this is no longer a problem.  Of course, it’s likely that Apple isn't allowing this in iOS 14 out of the goodness of its heart. Instead, it could be a tactical move. The company is already facing serious antitrust scrutiny as well as accusations that it holds an App Store monopoly, partially due to the 30 percent commission it charges developers (This is the basis of Epic’s recent legal battle with Apple). Perhaps, by ceding ground on default iOS apps, Apple could be heading off concerns that it holds a monopoly over that at the very least. It is not unlike when Microsoft was forced to unbundle Internet Explorer from Windows in 2009 due to European regulations.  Be that as it may, this could be a sign of greater things to come. It’s given me a glimmer of hope that other Google apps, like Calendar and Maps for example, could be given the default treatment too. Of course, there are many things that Android still does better than iOS, such as managing notifications, app permission handling, Live Transcribe, the ability to sideload apps not from an App Store, and more. But if all I get is greater access to Google’s apps and services while still keeping the phone I like, I’d be happy. In this article: Gmail, ios, iOS 14, Android, widgets, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 382 Shares Share Tweet Share

    Google server problems took out Gmail and other services briefly

    Sponsored Links Chesnot via Getty Images It feels unusual to see internet problems that aren’t related to someone trying to pre-order gaming equipment, but this evening users on the East and West coasts of the US experienced issues accessing Google services like Gmail, Google Docs, and even YouTube. As noted on trackers like DownDetector, the issue seemed to peak at about 9PM ET. Eventually Google’s server status updated to note the issue, and said it was resolved fully by around 10 PM. In a statement to Engadget, a Google Cloud spokesperson said “We experienced a short service disruption affecting several products including G Suite, and are now recovering.” We're very sorry for the outage, we know how critical these services are to everyone's lives. We're working on a postmortem to ensure this won't happen again. — Urs Hölzle (@uhoelzle) September 25, 2020 Urs Hölzle, the Senior Vice President for Technical Infrastructure at Google offered more detail in a tweet that was even retweeted by Google CEO Sundar Pichai. According to Hölzle, “A pool of servers that route traffic to application backends crashed, and users on that particular pool experienced the outage.” If you didn’t notice any disruption, then it’s because you weren’t connected to those particular servers, even as those who were experienced problems trying to turn in online homework, access their messages or get work done. In this article: Google, Gmail, G Suite, google cloud, outage, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 132 Shares Share Tweet Share

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