Thursday, May 19, 2022

The Final Fantasy 14 Housing Lottery Is Finally Fixed

Final Fantasy XIV’s housing lottery is finally fixed after one month of being broken.  On April 16, an FFXIV maintenance update indicated that the latest lottery cycle for housing in-game was broken, so when checking the placard where winners were to be shown, the placard said there were no winners. This meant nobody could obtain a house. Polygon reports the issue has been fixed as of yesterday, and now, winning lottery numbers will be displayed correctly, and land purchases may be finalized accordingly.  “As I mentioned in our previous update, we will be conducting maintenance to restore lottery results data on Monday, May 16,” FFXIV producer and director Naoki Yoshida writes in a new update. “This maintenance will fix identified errors and properly relay lottery results for affected plots to the appropriate servers.” As a result of this maintenance fix:  Winning lottery numbers will be displayed correctly, and land purchases may be finalized accordingly. Temporary suspensions imposed on plot purchases and relocations will be lifted.  Yoshida says that if you have a winning lottery number, you should finalize your land purchase by Thursday, May 26, as the next lottery cycle will begin that day, at which point, you will lose the ability to claim land you won during the current lottery. The next one will start on May 26 and have a typical five-day entry period and a four-day results period.  If you’re a winning participant who has already received a gil refund due to the recent lottery break, you will still be able to finalize a purchase on a won plot of land. Even if you received a refund and have since found out you won the lottery, you’ll still be treated as a winning lottery player.  “In Patch 6.2, we plan to implement an NPC by which you may voluntarily return the deposit you were accidentally refunded,” Yoshida writes. “As these housing lottery issues have been significant and caused great stress and frustration in many players, we have no intention of performing a data rollback to forcibly rescind any refunded gil. We will make an announcement regarding the voluntary return of housing deposits once the NPC in question is ready to be implemented.  “In closing, I would like to thank you all once again for your patience and understanding this past month, and extend my deepest apologies for the trouble and inconvenience these issues have caused. We will do everything in our power to safely restore your data, fix any remaining issues, and bring you all a fair and functional housing lottery system. Thank you for your continued support.”  For more FFXIV, read our exclusive interview feature with Yoshi-P, and then read Game Informer’s Final Fantasy XIV Endwalker review. Read Game Informer’s ranking of every mainline Final Fantasy game after that.  [Source: Polygon] Are you a Final Fantasy XIV housing lottery winner? Let us know in the comments below!
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    Apple won’t collect fees on paid Facebook events until 2021

    Sponsored Links Facebook Last month, Facebook and Apple clashed over App Store fees. Now, Apple seems to be easing up slightly. Businesses that host paid online events through Facebook on iOS will be able to keep all of their earnings (minus taxes), Facebook announced today. Apple will not collect its usual 30 percent commission on in-app purchases, but there are a few conditions. As you might remember, this summer, Facebook announced a new feature that allows businesses and creators to charge for online events hosted on the platform. Facebook said it wouldn’t collect fees from the events “for at least the next year.” But Facebook couldn’t convince Apple to waive its 30 percent fee or allow iOS users to use Facebook Pay, so that Facebook could absorb the costs for businesses. Facebook spoke out against Apple and its App Store fees. Now, Apple has agreed to let Facebook Pay process all paid online event purchases. This means Facebook can absorb the cost, and Apple won’t get a cut. But this agreement only lasts until December 31st. “Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will have to, yet again, pay Apple the full 30 percent App Store tax,” a Facebook spokesperson said. Facebook will not collect fees until August 2021. The other big catch is that Facebook Gaming creators are left out of the deal. They’ll still have to hand over 30 percent of earnings that come through the iOS app. “Apple’s decision to not collect its 30 percent tax on paid online events comes with a catch: gaming creators are excluded from using Facebook Pay in paid online events on iOS,” said Vivek Sharma, VP of Facebook Gaming. “We unfortunately had to make this concession to get the temporary reprieve for other businesses.” These battles over App Store fees are becoming more common. Sometimes they go better than others. Epic is now embroiled in a nasty legal battle with Apple, but Basecamp found a way to skirt Apple’s rules to get its Hey email app approved. Just yesterday, Epic, Spotify and others announced The Coalition for App Fairness, an alliance formed to pressure Apple and Google to change their app store rules. In this article: facebook, facebook gaming, apple, app store, fees, in-app purchases, iap, commission, waive, facebook pay, small businesses, online events, creators, news, gear, gaming All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 59 Shares Share Tweet Share

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