Monday, October 25, 2021

Blizzard Reveals New Name for Overwatch’s Cowboy

Due to harmful allegations regarding the real-life Jesse McCree (among […] The post Blizzard Reveals New Name for Overwatch’s Cowboy appeared first on ComingSoon.net.
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    Facebook files to dismiss FTC antitrust charges

    Facebook says the antitrust lawsuits targeting the company’s acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp should be dismissed. The company issued its first official response to antitrust charges from the Federal Trade Commission and 46 state attorneys general, saying that the government was seeking a “do-over.” Facebook filed motions to dismiss both cases. In a statement, the company said neither lawsuit had made a credible case for antitrust. “Antitrust laws are intended to promote competition and protect consumers,” Facebook wrote. “These complaints do not credibly claim that our conduct harmed either.” The response comes three months after the company was hit with antitrust charges from the FTC and the state attorneys general. Both cases allege that Facebook has engaged in anti-competitive behavior and that its deals to acquire Instagram and WhatsApp were meant to neutralize companies it saw as a threat. Facebook said this amounted to a do-over as both acquisitions were scrutinized, and approved, by the FTC years ago. In a new court filing, Facebook’s lawyers say that the FTC “has not alleged facts amounting to a plausible antitrust case,” and that the charges come amid a “fraught environment of relentless criticism of Facebook for matters entirely unrelated to antitrust concerns.” Regarding the case from state AGs, Facebook says that the states “lack standing to bring the case” and that they “waited far too long to act.” In its motion to dismiss the state charges, Facebook referred to the states’ case as “afterthought claims.” In addition to its acquisitions, both cases also pointed to Facebook’s platform policies, and how it treated third-party developers. The state case and the FTC lawsuit both called out Facebook’s treatment of Twitter-owned Vine, which saw its access to Facebook’s API cut off in 2013 in a decision that was approved by Mark Zuckerberg. In its motion to dismiss the FTC case, Facebook lawyers said the company “had no duty to make its platform available to any other app.” The FTC and the state AGs have until April to respond to Facebook’s motions to dismiss. As The Wall Street Journal points out, actually getting the charges dismissed before a trial requires Facebook to “meet a high legal standard” that may be difficult to clear. Even if it did, a dismissal would hardly be the end of Facebook’s antitrust woes. The company is also facing an antitrust investigation from Congress and regulators in the European Union.

    Instagram shall let four users go reside in an individual stream

    Instagram is expanding Live to accommodate more than two broadcasters in a single stream. The platform has unveiled Live Rooms, which (like Twitch's Squad Stream) will allow up to four people to go live together. In its announcement, Instagram says the hope is to open more opportunities for users by allowing people to host things like talk shows, jam sessions or group tutorials with more than one friend. The feature will start rolling out today (March 1st), and should reach all users over the course of the week. People have been using Instagram's Live feature a lot more and in new ways since pandemic—related lockdowns started in 2020. The government has been using it to spread awareness about COVID-19 guidelines, for instance, and entertainment outfits are using it to broadcast interviews with celebrities. Over the past year, the platform has made Live streams viewable on the web to give people the option to watch them on larger screens and allowed users to save them to IGTV to make them available for viewing longer than 24 hours. In October, Instagram also extended the maximum length of a stream to four hours, up from just an hour. Expanding the number of people that can go live together is another way for creators to reach their audiences. Instagram also expects Live Rooms to give them more opportunities to earn money, since the feature could potentially grow their following. Viewers can buy badges from streamers during a Live for more visibility, after all, buy products from them or donate to their non-profits. Users can start broadcasting by swiping left and picking the Live camera option. They'll then have to tap the Rooms icon and choose guests to add — they can either broadcast with people who've requested to go live with them or send invites to other people. The platform assures that users blocked by any of the broadcasters in a Live won't be able to see it and that all features available to Live hosts, such as the ability to report and block comments, will also be available to Live Rooms hosts. Instagram

    Instagram says it’s cracking down on harassment in direct messages and will permanently ban accounts that use direct messages to harass or threaten other users. The change comes after several football players in the UK have reported racist attacks on the app.  In a blog post, Instagram acknowledged the “racist online abuse targeted at footballers” and added that direct messages are more difficult for the company to police because the company doesn’t use the same automated technology it uses to detect bullying in comments. But with the new policy, Instagram says it will take “tougher action” when harassment in direct messages is reported.  Previously, Instagram would temporarily limit an account’s ability to use DMs when harassment was reported. Now, the company says that repeated “violating messages” will result in a permanent suspension from its service. “We’ll also disable new accounts created to get around our messaging restrictions, and will continue to disable accounts we find that are created purely to send abusive messages,” Instagram writes.  The company also says that it’s working on making the DM controls that allow users to disable messages from accounts they don’t follow available to everyone.

    Even LinkedIn now has Stories

    Sponsored Links LinkedIn LinkedIn is the latest platform to embrace the disappearing Stories format. The professional networking site unveiled its latest redesign that makes the company’s months-long experiment with LinkedIn Stories official. Beginning today, the company is rolling out the feature to all its users in the US and Canada, with plans to push it out to everyone in the next few weeks.  LinkedIn’s version of Stories is a lot like what you’d find on Instagram or Snapchat. Take a photo, decorate it with text or a GIF and upload to your profile for all your professional connections to see for 24 hours (you can change up your privacy settings to control who can view your Story.) And, in case you need an extra reminder that the feature exists, LinkedIn will place all your connections’ Stories at the top of your main feed. That might sound like the last feature you’d want or need on LinkedIn, but the company says there are some benefits to consider. Liz Li, LinkedIn’s senior director of product, says that early tests of the feature have shown that some people are more willing to post when they know it will disappear after 24 hours, rather than live on their LinkedIn profile forever. “Members in the past have found sharing on LinkedIn to be intimidating,” Li told Engadget. “We're hoping it'll spark more conversations from people who just don't really share content on LinkedIn.” LinkedIn Li also notes that Stories can help coworkers feel connected at a time when many people are still working from home and may otherwise feel disconnected from colleagues. That said, she says the intention is to keep things professional. Stories will feature a rotating “question of the day” that’s supposed to help keep folks on track.  “You're not meant to share the same things that you would on other networks,” Li says. “That doesn't mean you can't share a picture of your dog … but the goal is to keep it keep the conversations in the same vein that you would have right in your workplace.” Besides Stories, the redesign comes with some other updates. The site’s search features have been overhauled to include new filtering options, and the ability to find online courses and other LinkedIn content from the main search tool. Messaging is also getting another Facebook-like feature with emoji reactions, as well as the ability to start a video call directly from chat. Video calling, which will roll out in October, supports Zoom, Microsoft Teams, Slack and BlueJeans (which is owned by Engadget’s parent company, Verizon). In this article: linkedin, Social media, instagram, internet, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 55 Shares Share Tweet Share

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