Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Official PlayStation Podcast Episode 394: Crash Landing

Email us at [email protected]! Subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google or RSS, or download here Hey y’all! This week we sit down with composer Bobby Krlic, who shares the creative process behind crafting Returnal’s soundtrack. Stuff We Talked About Mass Effect Legendary EditionOddworld: SoulstormReturnal (interview begins at 21:20)Outer Wilds The WitnessDisco Elysium – The Final CutGames that made us see things differently in the real world The Cast Sid Shuman – Senior Director of Content Communications, SIE Tim Turi –  Senior Content Communications Specialist, SIE Thanks to Cory Schmitz for our beautiful logo and Dormilón for our rad theme song and show music. [Editor’s note: PSN game release dates are subject to change without notice. Game details are gathered from press releases from their individual publishers and/or ESRB rating descriptions.]
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    Ireland has imposed some of the toughest COVID-19 rules

    Ireland has imposed one of the toughest covid-19 constraints on Monday where It has shut all non-essential retail, restaurants, and pubs to have limited takeaway services and it is telling people not to travel for more than 5 km from their home. As the coronavirus cases surged early this year Ireland had imposed some of the longest lockdowns and it eased the restrictions at a gradual pace and the pubs serving drinks were not allowed but again there was a rise in infections prompting the authorities to impose another round of lockdown. Now, the Prime Minister of Ireland Micheal Martin said that the country now has Level 5 of restrictions for six weeks from Wednesday, and schools and essential services will continue to operate. Hotels too will remain open, but the rooms are available for essential workers. “The evidence of a potentially grave situation arising in the weeks ahead is now too strong,” said Martin said in a televised address. He also said that the government is aiming to return to Level 3 from December 01 onwards. The retailers and restaurants will serve 15 customers outdoor and even then, the potential lockdown cannot be ruled even in 2021, the prime minister said. Many of the European countries such as Belgium, the Netherlands, and France have been hit hard by the second wave of Coronavirus where they have shut bars, restaurants, and have imposed nighttime curfew however, neither of them has strict travel restrictions within the country. Northern Ireland has been hit hard where the authorities have shut schools for 2 weeks and restaurants for 4 weeks but most retailers will remain open. In Wales, the authorities have imposed two weeks of strict lockdown and named it ‘Fire-Break’ Lockdown on Monday. The government has also agreed to increase the amount that it contributes to coronavirus-related jobless payments until the 31st of January. The Jobless rates, including emergency payments, stood at 14.7% last month and the finance minister said that the economy could contract again if there are stringent restrictions next year. “We can do it this year, we can do it next year,” the Prime Minister said for the financial support however he mentioned that there should be a vaccine found next year. Add to Bookmarks

    Apple's Irish tax deal will be scrutinized by Europe's highest court

    Sponsored Links Yves Herman / reuters The European Commission refuses to back down in its long-running legal battle against Apple and the Irish government’s tax arrangements. Today, the executive branch of the European Union announced that it would appeal a decision granted by the General Court in July that sided with the juggernaut technology company. The Commission believes that the Court “made a number of errors of law” and wants the case re-examined by the European Court of Justice — the highest form of scrutiny in the EU. “We need to continue our efforts to put in place the right legislation to address loopholes and ensure transparency,” Margrethe Vestager, the European Commissioner for Competition said in a statement. So what exactly are they fighting over? Money. Specifically, how much Apple has been paying in taxes to the Irish authorities. The company has operated in the country for decades and, like many other large multinationals, benefitted from its historically low tax rates. In the metaphorical eyes of the Commission, though, Apple has been given preferential treatment. That’s why the company has been paying an effective rate of tax that’s close to one percent. The Commission launched an investigation in 2014 and declared three months later that Apple’s situation should be categorised as state aid. Then, in 2016, it ruled that Apple owed Ireland roughly $14.5 billion in unpaid tax. Unsurprisingly, Apple disagreed. The company’s appeals were initially unsuccessful, however. In 2016, it started transferring money into an escrow account that would only be emptied once a final decision was made. By September 2018, the company had all of its unpaid taxes, plus interest, in that holding account. Apple hasn’t given up on its legal defence, however, and won a remarkable decision this year. The General Court said the Commission couldn’t prove that Apple was given preferential treatment and, as a result, the deal can’t be declared as state aid. The Commission is desperate to win the case, however, to bring more taxes back into the EU market, which is currently grappling with a pandemic-fuelled downturn. “If Member States give certain multinational companies tax advantages not available to their rivals, this harms fair competition in the European Union in breach of State aid rules,” Vestager said. “We have to continue to use all tools at our disposal to ensure companies pay their fair share of tax. Otherwise, the public purse and citizens are deprived of funds for much needed investments – the need for which is even more acute now to support Europe’s economic recovery.” Apple thinks differently. “The General Court categorically annulled the Commission’s case in July and the facts have not changed since then,” a spokesperson for the company said. “This case has never been about how much tax we pay, rather where we are required to pay it. We will review the Commission’s appeal when we receive it, however it will not alter the factual conclusions of the General Court, which prove that we have always abided by the law in Ireland, as we do everywhere we operate.” In this article: politics, EU, Ireland, taxes, apple, europe, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 43 Shares Share Tweet Share

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