Tuesday, August 16, 2022

Viggo Mortensen Details Thirteen Lives’ Challenging Diving Scenes

During an interview with ComingSoon, Thirteen Lives star Viggo Mortensen spoke about […] The post Viggo Mortensen Details Thirteen Lives’ Challenging Diving Scenes appeared first on ComingSoon.net.
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    Exclusive: Listen to ‘Summer Lawns’ From Drum & Lace’s Summering Soundtrack

    The soundtrack releases August 12. The post Exclusive: Listen to ‘Summer Lawns’ From Drum & Lace’s Summering Soundtrack appeared first on ComingSoon.net.

    Spotify's shared playlist queue feature expands to Polestar 2 vehicles

    Last year, Spotify started beta testing Group Sessions. It's a feature that allows up to six people to share control over the music playing in the background of a physical or virtual get-together. Those involved can queue up songs, podcasts and playlists, as well as skip tracks they don't like. In an expansion spotted by The Verge, you can now take advantage of Group Sessions in the first (and currently only) Android Automotive car, the Polestar 2. Once a driver starts a session, everyone else in the car can join by scanning the Spotify code that appears on the Polestar 2's front display. One important limitation is that only those with Spotify Premium accounts can join, so not just anyone can hijack your playlist and turn a fun road trip into an exercise in patience. The driver can also revoke access at any time because, as Polestar correctly points out, "passengers aren't always right."

    The most recent Google Arts & Culture exhibit enables you to explore days gone by history of electronic music

    If you have any interest at all in electronic music, you owe it to yourself to check out Google’s latest Arts & Culture exhibit. Music, Makers and Machines celebrates the history of the genre, highlighting the people, sounds and technologies that helped make electronic music what it is today. Google got help on the project from more than 50 international institutions, record labels and industry experts, including the Moogseum. [embedded content] One highlight is an entire section devoted to the early days of Dubstep. You’ll find short, written segments on artists like Burial and the subgenre's development complemented by photos and YouTube videos. You can even use Google Street View to explore the locations of long-closed but seminal clubs like Plastic People. Another compelling exhibit explores the role Black artists and musicians have played in pushing the boundaries of electronic music. That said, the highlight of the exhibit is an AR synth module that allows you to play around with five classic instruments, including the Roland CR-78 and Akai S900. Speaking of synths, Google has uploaded 3D models of some of the most iconic ones. You can check out Music, Makers and Machines online, as well as through the Google Arts & Culture app on Android and iOS.

    Ever heard a catchy song on your smart speaker and wanted to share it right away? You can act on that impulse if you have an Echo. Amazon is rolling out a music sharing feature that lets you share songs with Alexa contacts using Echo devices or the Alexa app. Ask the voice assistant to “share this song with” a contact and they can not only choose to listen, but send a reaction. Thankfully, you don’t need to use Amazon Music or even the same streaming service as your recipient. Alexa will try to find a track on any services available to you. If there’s no match, you’ll still get a station based on the artist’s name and song title. You can try the feature by enabling Alexa Communications. If you’re not sure about the contacts that can receive a song, you can start a new message to see who’s available. Amazon characterized this as “just the beginning” of the sharing feature, hinting at possible upgrades in the future. For now, though, the feature could be helpful if you’d rather not turn to text messages or social networks just to spread the word about a can’t-miss tune — at least, so long as your friends are as invested in the Alexa ecosystem as you are.

    Meters' OV-1-B Connect headphones have VU dials and a $349 price tag

    Daniel Cooper The best laid schemes of mice, men and niche British audio brands can go awry when the world is gripped by a global pandemic. Meters Music announced its new flagship headphones back in January, with shipping due a few months later. It’s now December, and this is the first time we’ve seen the new OV-1-B Connect cans in the flesh.  Meters Music is a part of Ashdown Engineering, a British company that makes bass amplifiers for musicians. Its selling point is the inclusion of working analog VU (Volume Unit) meters in its pro hardware, which are also added to the headphones. Here, both ear cups have outward-facing VU monitors, making it look like you’re wearing a ‘70s HiFi unit on your head.  The headphones are sturdily built, with an emphasis on retro styling, a silver aluminum body and a faux-leather headband in tan, black or white. They’re not the lightest cans in the world, but the weight is at least well-balanced, and the thick faux-leather keeps them soft. I’ve worn them for two or three hours at a time and found them to be comfortable enough on my head when placed just so.  Daniel Cooper I’m not the first (or the hundredth) person to point out how much of an affectation the VU meters are. You can’t see them unless you’ve got a couple of mirrors and a bendy neck, so they’re not the most useful to see if your music is too loud. They’re calibrated to EU listening standards, and so only really start bouncing when the audio reaches semi-uncomfortable levels anyway. They’re sensitive enough, however, that with the audio off, they’ll jump pretty far when you have a small coughing fit. Meters says that the point of them, beyond the fashion, to help parents see if their kids are listening to their music too loudly. (Who knew that there was a market for parents who buy their kids luxury headphones big enough to sustain a whole company?) Really, they’re an easy way for you to tell the world that, ya know, you really care about the music, yeah? There’s an RGB LED hidden behind each VU meter, and you can change the color of the backlight from the default yellow, as well as the brightness. In terms of additional flourishes, it’s nice, but you’ll soon notice the other shades don’t really go with the set’s retro stylings. In fact, after scrolling through the colors, I realized that the default yellow was put there for a reason.  Daniel Cooper Meters made a big deal about the inclusion of Qualcomm's QCC5124 SoC, which offers low power Bluetooth 5.0 connections and 24-bit audio. The resulting sound is ruthlessly clean and clear, making it ideal for songs that aren’t too aggressive, with subtle treble and vocal tracks. Go for something a little meatier, with a lot of bass, and things remain fairly polite and clean.  I switched to a high-res audio player and played some studio masters in FLAC, Meters’ strengths and weaknesses are even more exposed. Throw classical, or delicate-like-spider-silk songs at the OV-1-B-Connect, and you’ll be treated to beautiful songs reproduced beautifully. It excels at playing delicate music, but this milquetoast reproduction is at odds with its rock-and-roll stylings. With closed back ear cups and ANC, you can drown out a heck of a lot of ambient noise with these things. Since we’re not able to fly right now, I instead sat and asked my two kids to scream, jump around and generally be awful in my general direction. And I was barely able to hear any of that while listening to something mellow, enjoying the most blissful moment of zen I’ve had in weeks.  Daniel Cooper It’s not all perfect, however. One of the biggest objections with the previous version of these headphones was the fixed ANC and EQ modes, controlled with a physical switch. To remedy that, the company has launched Meters Connect, an Android / iOS app that lets you dynamically adjust the EQ (and change the VU meter backlight). To say I’ve had issues with the app is something of an understatement, with regular connection brownouts slowing down the firmware updates. When I was able to play with the EQ, however, I found that you can either make the songs excessively, unpleasantly crunchy or hissy but still relatively flat. In fact, it’s one of those options that presumably makes sense somewhere, to someone, but seems less than pointless for general use. Perhaps the professional musicians and producers that Meters consults with (and uses in its promotional material) get more out of the technology than I do. Daniel Cooper While I’m nitpicking, I’d add that this is a brand new pair of $349 headphones which still ship with a micro-USB cable for charging. It’s not a deal breaker, but it does mean that, if you’re living in a USB-C world, you still can’t ditch the legacy cables in your carry case. Fundamentally, Meters’ had plenty of fundamentals in place, with a good-looking pair of well-made headphones and a unique statement feature. But I’m struggling to really connect with this device in the sound itself, which to my non-audiophile ears seems to be fussier than it needs to be. When you’re asking for this sort of money, you don’t just need to be good — which these can be — you need to be better than Sony’s class-leading WH-1000XM4. Sadly, we’re not quite there yet.  In this article: Meters Music, Meters, VU Meter, Headphones, Cans, ANC, Bluetooth, Ashdown Engineering, Music, feature, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

    Bad Bunny is Spotify's most-streamed artist of 2020

    Spotify ‘Tis the season for top 10 lists, so nearly every streaming service or content-hosting website will release its “best of” roundups between now and the end of the month. Spotify is one of the regulars, and as part of its annual Wrapped festivities, the company has revealed its top charts for the year. For 2020, Bad Bunny is the most-streamed artist on the platform globally with over 8.3 billion streams, followed by Drake, J Balvin, Juice WRLD and The Weeknd — in that order. Billie Eilish is the most popular female artist for a second straight year with Taylor Swift, Ariana Grande, Dua Lipa and Halsey rounding out the top 5. The Weeknd’s “Blinding Lights” is the most-streamed song globally with almost 1.6 billion streams this year, while Bad Bunny’s YHLQMDLG is the top album — amassing over 3.3 billion streams. Other popular albums, in order of global rank, include The Weeknd’s After Hours, Post Malone’s Hollywood’s Bleeding, Harry Styles’ Fine Line and Dua Lipa’s Future Nostalgia. When it comes to the rest of the top-five singles, “Dance Monkey” by Tones and I, “The Box” by Roddy Ricch, “Roses - Imanbek Remix” by Imanbek and SAINt JHN and “Don’t Start Now” by Dua Lipa finish up that list. In 2019, Spotify bet big on podcasts and it continued to do so in 2020. This year, future Spotify exclusive show The Joe Rogan Experience is the most popular podcast globally. That’s a pretty impressive feat considering it just debuted on Spotify in September. And of course, that’s a great sign considering the podcast will become exclusive to the service at the end of the year and reports indicate the agreement is worth over $100 million. Interestingly, Rogan’s show falls to number two on the US chart, with NPR News Now eclipsing it for the top spot in the States. TED Talks Daily, The New York Times’ The Daily, The Michelle Obama Podcast and Barstool Sports’ Call Her Daddy also make up Spotify’s year-end top five. As far as podcast genres are concerned, Society & Culture is number one, followed by Comedy, Lifestyle & Health, Arts & Entertainment and Education. In typical Spotify fashion, the company also noted some trends for 2020. Unsurprisingly, the service saw 1,400+ percent increase in work-from-home-themed (WFH) playlists between April and May. What’s more, the company says about 65,000 playlists were created by users with the title “Black Lives Matter” or “BLM.” Perhaps as a coping mechanism, Spotify users contributed to a 180 percent increase in health and wellness podcast listening in 2020. And overall, the most popular time to listen to a podcast this year on the platform was between 6AM-9AM. While the US top charts stack up similarly to the global lists, there are some interesting changes. The full collection of top-five charts for the US are as follows: US Most Streamed Artists: Juice WRLD Drake Lil Uzi Vert Post Malone Taylor Swift US Most Streamed Female Artists: Taylor Swift Billie Eilish Ariana Grande Halsey Megan Thee Stallion US Most Streamed Songs: “The Box” by Roddy Ricch “Blinding Lights” by The Weeknd “Blueberry Faygo” by Lil Mosey “ROCKSTAR (feat Roddy Ricch)” by DaBaby, Roddy Ricch “Life Is Good (feat Drake)” by Drake, Future US Most Streamed Albums: Legends Never Die, Juice WRLD Eternal Atake (Deluxe) - LUV vs. The World 2, Lil Uzi Vert Hollywood’s Bleeding, Post Malone After Hours, The Weeknd Please Excuse Me For Being Antisocial, Roddy Ricch US Most Popular Podcasts: NPR News Now The Joe Rogan Experience The Daily Call Her Daddy The Michelle Obama Podcast US Most Popular Podcast Genres: Comedy Society & Culture Lifestyle & Health News Education In this article: spotify, 2020, top charts, charts, music, music streaming, podcast, podcasts, bad bunny, the weekend, joe rogan, the joe rogan experience, billie eilish, juice wrld, wrapped, news, gear, entertainment All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

    Roli’s light-up, learn-to-play Lumi keyboard can be acquired for pre-order

    Sponsored Links Roli / James North Pre-orders for Roli’s crowdfunded Lumi keyboard are now open. The small, light-up keyboard pairs with a companion app and is meant to help you learn how to play music, whether you want to dive right into your favorite pop songs (Beyonce) or start with the classics (Beethoven). At first glance, Lumi looks like other small MIDI keyboards. But the keys all light up via internal LEDs. Those sync to a Lumi app, available on iOS and Android. The free app comes with 40 songs, more than 60 lessons and 72 exercises. For $9.99 per month, the premium version of the app offers more than 400 songs, more than 130 lessons and 380 exercises. Roli / James North Since we first demoed Lumi, Roli has made a few improvements. The hardware is now heavier and more durable. The key action performance and sensitivity is improved, and Roli improved the app’s navigation and overall performance. It helps that Roli has a strong track record, which includes the Seaboard Rise and Roli Blocks. You can get the light-up Lumi keyboard — along with a free case, free shipping and a $50 voucher for Lumi Premium — for $299. But you’ll have to act relatively quickly. Stock is limited, so orders will ship on a first-come, first-serve basis. The first shipments will go out in early November. Roli / James North In this article: lumi, keyboard, roli, midi, light-up, learn, music, kickstart, pre-order, available, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 14 Shares Share Tweet Share

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