Friday, May 7, 2021

Halo Debuts New 'World Of Halo' Stop-Motion Video Series, Episode 1 Available Now

While we continue to wait for a Halo Infinite release date other than the anticipated November 2021 window, the team over at 343 Industries has a different sort of Master Chief-inspired project to share. Using the Jazwares action figure line, the stop-motion series called World of Halo just debuted its first episode. You can watch it below. Spoiler alert: it's pretty awesome. The Jazwares line is surprisingly detailed for being a mere four inches tall and seeing them in action in this format is kind of cool to see as a Halo fan myself. From a fight to death with the iconic energy sword to seeing some of the most recognizable enemies in the Halo-verse, the first episode of this series has us pretty jazzed to see what's next. Especially being a massive collector.  [embedded content] Master Chief's badassery, glowing energy swords, grunts screaming in panic - what more could you want? Other than a Halo Infinite gameplay trailer, but don't worry about that. 343 Industries has recently confirmed that a new gameplay reveal is coming this Summer to show off what the team has been working on since criticism hit about its next-gen graphics.  In other Halo news, 343 recently shared off a new screenshot from the main campaign, which you can see here, detailing the various PC-specific settings for resolution. The team also confirmed that Halo Infinite will include cross-progression and crossplay between Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, and PC, so that anyone can enjoy the latest game without worried about being tied to one specific platform.  To learn more about Halo Infinite before the gameplay trailer drops in the coming months, you can scope out our dedicated game hub. From fan desires to inside looks, catch up on the latest news right here.  Thoughts on Halo Infinite and the latest stop-motion video with World of Halo? Sound off in the comments below; Cortana would want you to. 
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    Microsoft will offer you AMD CPUs across its Surface Laptop 4 lineup reportedly

    Since 2019, Microsoft has offered a 15-inch version of the Surface Laptop 3 that you can configure with an AMD processor. And now it looks like the company plans to offer that same option to people who want the 13.5-inch model. According to a report from WinFuture spotted by Windows Central, Microsoft will release the Surface Laptop 4 in April and you’ll have AMD and Intel processor options in both 13.5-inch and 15-inch sizes. The company will reportedly offer “Surface Edition” variants of the Ryzen 5 4680U and Ryzen 7 4980U. That’s an improvement on the 3580U and 3780U currently available with the Surface Laptop 3, but a step below the 5000 series chips AMD announced at the start of the year. Meanwhile, those who want an Intel processor will be able to choose between the Core i5 1145G7 and Core i7 1185G7. Both of those come from Intel’s latest 11th generation Tiger Lake series. It also looks like the only way you’ll be able to configure the Surface Laptop 4 with either 32GB of RAM or 1TB of internal storage will be to buy one of the Intel models as the maximum with the AMD variants is reportedly 16GB of RAM and 512GB of storage. Beyond that, it doesn’t look like the Surface Laptop will get many other upgrades. According to the spec sheet WinFuture shared, both models will keep their current 2256 x 1504 and 2496 x 1664 resolution displays and they’ll ship with the same mix of ports. Of course, that’s assuming WinFuture’s information is accurate. Thankfully, it doesn't seem like we'll have to wait long to see what Microsoft has up its sleeve.

    iCloud locked out a user over her last name allegedly

    iCloud has had the occasional service issue, but its latest problem appears to be highly... specific. Actor and author Rachel True claims iCloud has effectively locked her out of her account due to the way her last name was written. Reportedly, her Mac thought lower-case "true" was a Boolean (true or false) flag, leading the iCloud software on the computer to seize up. The problem has persisted for over six months, she said. True said she'd spent hours talking to customer service, and that Apple hadn't stopped charging her for service. She could switch to the free tier, although she'd also lose most of her online storage if she did.  We've asked Apple for comment. This is a rare flaw if it works as described. Even if you share the last name True (or False, for that matter), you'd have to type it a specific way to reproduce the problem. Still, it raises the question of how MacOS could mistake a name for a software flag in the first place. At least it doesn't appear to respond to direct commands — though you might want to get a name change if your surname is "rm rf," just to be on the safe side. Can get your coders to free my last name from icloud jail?Been locked out for 6+ months because of an uncapitalized t in TRUE, my surname but also a computer command.Now that I a layman have explained problem to you a giant computer company, could u [email protected] @AppleSupport https://t.co/TSEjUU1nXF — Rachel True (@RachelTrue) March 6, 2021

    Apple shall stop selling the iMac Pro

    If you were hoping to buy an iMac Pro for some serious work, you'd better act quickly. 9to5Mac reports (and Apple has confirmed to Engadget) that Apple is winding down sales of its all-in-one workstation. You can still buy one, but it's limited to the base 10-core Xeon configuration and only available "while supplies last." You'll have to be patient, too, as orders are taking three to four weeks as we write this. Apple told Engadget that most pro customers would likely be satisfied by the high-end 2020 iMac, which made SSDs standard and includes more recent graphics, up to 128GB of RAM and the option of a glare-reducing nano texture display finish. Customers who need more can always buy a Mac Pro tower, the company added. It's not clear if or when there will be a replacement, but we wouldn't count on it. The iMac Pro was introduced in late 2017 as an effective stopgap system while high-end customers waited for a redesigned Mac Pro. While Apple did bump up the base spec from an eight-core CPU to 10, it never updated the hardware beyond that — however much Intel's sluggish Xeon update schedule played a role, it was also evident Apple threw most of its weight behind the Mac Pro. This iMac was mostly useful for pro users who needed a relatively easy-to-transport machine for tasks like on-set photo and video editing. As it stands, the iMac Pro faced an uncertain future. Apple's transition to in-house silicon was bound to prompt a rethink of the company's pro system strategy. Rumors have swirled of future iMacs with up to 16 high-speed cores, not to mention a mini Mac Pro desktop. If true, there wouldn't be much point to a new iMac Pro when other systems could do the job at least as well. Don't mourn the iMac Pro too much, then, as its successors may be more than capable of filling the gap.

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