Saturday, April 17, 2021

Oddworld: Soulstorm Review – A NEGATIVE Batch Of Brew

Playing Oddworld: Soulstorm is as arduous as Abe’s quest to liberate his Mudoken brethren from slavery. Each step is a supreme test of patience as you methodically guide your followers through challenging hazards, sweating over the fact that one slip-up could unravel all your effort. If you enjoy putting up with that old-school challenge, you might love this journey. However, if you’re a newcomer or a fan that believes this style of platformer hasn’t aged very well, turn back now. Soulstorm doesn’t do enough to modernize the series’ tedious gameplay, and a litany of severe technical hiccups spoil Abe’s attempted comeback. A reimagining of Oddworld: Abe's Exoddus, Soulstorm’s gameplay remains largely the same: you recruit and guide followers through 2D platforming stages littered with dangers. As charming as the classic Oddworld games are, they can be frustratingly difficult and that hasn’t changed much in Soulstorm. Most Slig enemies and other hazards mow Abe down instantly, and I was infuriated by how little wiggle room I had to correct course when things went sideways. Abe drops so fast that it makes the health meter seem like a cruel tease. While playing Soulstorm, I often felt like I was walking on eggshells because of that high price of failure, retracing every step, re-recruiting every Mudokon, and carefully guiding them through a gauntlet of foes is soul-crushing when it all falls apart in seconds. Dying to unexpected perils, like being suddenly gunned down by off-screen enemies, feels cheap and happens way too often. A crafting system serves as Soulstorm’s biggest addition, but it doesn’t feel necessary. You must repeatedly gather the same ingredients every time you die (by searching lockers, trash cans, and fallen foes), which wore me down in a hurry after repeatedly replaying certain sections. The crafted tools themselves, like proximity mines, smoke screens, even a flamethrower, do add a welcomed element of flexibility and improvisation to gameplay. Dropping smoke screens to create hiding spots anywhere is nice, but I wished I didn’t have to make these items myself and grew tired of digging around the same spots over and over.   Even when Soulstorm’s difficulty eases up, the gameplay is bland. The action feels largely the same from previous games in the series, and that formula doesn’t evolve significantly beyond the first few hours. Even the more interesting sequences, like facing down a giant mech aboard a speeding train, are far too punishing to be fun. I’m glad that Abe controls better now (he even has a double jump), but the controls still have a mushy unresponsiveness that makes entertaining actions, like possessing Sligs, feel like a hassle. The controls also lead to additional deaths because Abe doesn’t act as swiftly as you need him to, especially during the ill-fitting, overly demanding combat arenas that pit you against waves of baddies while you try to protect fleeing Mudokens. Soulstorm would be a tough recommendation for anyone outside of diehard fans if it performed flawlessly, but I encountered several progress-sabotaging bugs (even after installing the big day-one patch) that should scare off even those players. When I died, Mudokens sometimes failed to respawn alongside me even though my tally indicated they were still alive and under my command. That meant I lost out on turning in followers that I’d spent ages trying to safely liberate, which negatively affected my overall quarma – a vital metric in determining which of the four endings you get.  Abe occasionally gets stuck in environmental geometry, forcing a restart. At one point, I fell into an infinite loop. One escape portal permanently vanished once I reached it, forcing me to abandon followers. A gun in a late-game turret sequence failed to shoot despite working fine in previous segments. After multiple restarts, I randomly discovered that clicking the right stick “fixed” the weapon for some reason, allowing it to fire. I spent over an hour trying to lead a large group of followers through a particularly challenging area, but once I opened the exit door an invisible wall prevented me from moving forward. I was forced to restart this entire, lengthy sequence twice before the exit worked properly. Soulstorm’s gameplay pushed my patience to its limits, but these bugs sent me over the edge and made me nervous every time I started a new level. “What on Earth is going to screw me over this time?” I regularly asked myself. Soulstorm’s faults are a shame because its narrative and presentation brought a smile to my face. Abe and his pals are goofy, delightful underdogs I couldn’t help but root for. The enjoyable story is packed with heart, and the cutscenes look great. I wanted to welcome Abe into a new generation of gaming with open arms, but Soulstorm fails to make a case for why its brand of cinematic platforming works today. In fact, Soulstorm only reaffirmed that Abe’s past adventures are best viewed with rose-colored glasses.
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    Here Today sony Acquires Billy Crystal’s, Sets might Release Date

    Sony acquires Billy Crystal’s Here Today, sets May release dateIt’s been 20 years since Emmy winner and Golden Globe nominee Billy Crystal (Standing Up, Falling Down) last stepped into the director’s chair for the HBO sports biographical drama 61* and now his latest effort, Here Today, is finally coming to audiences as Sony Pictures’ Stage 6 Films has acquired the rights to the dramedy.RELATED: Tiffany Haddish to Star in Netflix’s Film Adaptation of Mystery GirlCo-written by Crystal and fellow Saturday Night Live alum Alan Zweibel based on his short story “The Prize,” the film follows veteran comedy writer Charlie Burnz (Crystal) as he meets New York singer Emma Payge (Tiffany Haddish) and forms an unlikely-yet-hilarious and touching friendship that kicks the generation gap aside and redefines the meaning of love and trust.“I am thrilled that Here Today will be in theaters with real people soon,” Crystal said in a statement to Deadline. “It was a joy to write with my dear friend Alan Zweibel. To get to act with and direct the hilarious Tiffany Haddish and our fantastic cast was a blessing. I haven’t been this excited since I got my second Moderna vaccine.”Alongside Crystal and Haddish (Bad Trip), the ensemble cast for the film is comprised of Penn Badgley (You, Gossip Girl), Laura Benanti (Gossip Girl, Younger), Louisa Krause (The Girlfriend Experience, Dark Waters), Anna Deavere Smith (Flora & Ulysses, For The People) and Nyambi Nyambi (The Good Fight, Blindspotting).In addition to co-writing, directing and starring, Crystal produced the film alongside Zweibel, Haddish, Fred Bernstein and Dominique Telso, with Rick Jackson, Claudine Marrotte and Samantha Sprecher attached as executive producers and Astute Films producing in association with Face Productions and Big Head Productions.RELATED: The Man from Toronto: Sony Pictures’ Action Comedy Gets Release DateStage 6 has set Here Today for a May 7 release.

    Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway Release Date Moves Up

    Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway moves upOriginally slated for July 2, Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway now shifts up to an earlier release date of June 18. With cinemas opening up again, this move makes a play for summer vacation families eager to go back to the theaters.The first film, Peter Rabbit, opened in 2018 and went on to take in $351M worldwide.RELATED: First Ghostbusters: Afterlife Clip Features the Return of Stay PuftIn Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway, the lovable bunny is back. Bea, Thomas, and the rabbits have created a found family of their own. Even with a new life, Peter can’t seem to shake his mischievous reputation. Adventuring out of the garden, he finds himself in a world where his mischief is appreciated. Realizing he is missing, Peter’s family risks everything to go looking for him. Seeing what he has at stake, Peter must figure out what kind of bunny he wants to be.James Corden returns to lead an ensemble voice cast as the voice of Peter Rabbit. Margot Robbie and Elizabeth Debicki return as the voices of Flopsy Rabbit and Mopsy Rabbit and Domhnall Gleeson and Rose Byrne are reprising their live-action roles as Thomas and Bea. Aimee Horne has stepped in to replace Daisy Ridley in the role of Cottontail Rabbit. The sequel also features the additions of Emmy nominee David Oyelowo, Lennie James, Rupert Degas, and Damon Herriman. RELATED: Ghostbusters and Jumanji rides set for new Columbia Pictures Aquaverse ParkPeter Rabbit 2: The Runaway is written and directed by Will Gluck, who returns having co-written the script with Patrick Burleigh, based on the characters and tales of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter. The film is produced by Gluck alongside Zareh Nalbandian, Catherine Bishop, and Jodie Hildebrand, with Doug Belgrad, Jonathan Hludzinski, Emma Topping, and Thomas Merrington serving as executive producers on the film. 

    Spider-Man 3: Jamie Foxx Teases New Appearance for Electro 

    Spider-Man 3: Jamie Foxx Teases New Appearance for Electro A day after the news broke out about Jamie Foxx’s potential return as Electro, the Academy Award-winning actor has confirmed (in a now deleted Instagram post) that he has indeed signed on to star opposite Tom Holland in Marvel Studios and Sony Pictures’ highly-anticipated third Spider-Man MCU film. In his post which you can check out below (via Twitter), Foxx’s also teased that his villain character will be returning with a new appearance. Because of this, fans are speculating if he will either play a different iteration of the character, or if it will be the same one as Andrew Garfield’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2 leading the film into the multiverse realm. Interestingly, the deleted post also came with Spider-Man fan art, featuring Tobey Maguire, Garfield and Holland’s versions of the friendly-neighbor-hood hero! Jamie Foxx confirmed tElectro won’t be blue in ‘SPIDER-MAN 3’ and hinted at a possible Spider-Verse in the MCU  pic.twitter.com/KLqiV76PDI — cosmic (@cosmic_marvel) October 2, 2020 RELATED: Marvel’s Spider-Man: Remastered Gets a New Face For Peter Parker Tom Holland will return for the film as the titular wall-crawler, and it remains to be seen what villains he’ll go up against in the trilogy caper. Given the ending of Far From Home however, any number of his rogues gallery are likely eager for a fight. The third installment to the MCU’s Spider-Man films will also feature the return of Zendaya (Euphoria, Dune) as MJ. Holland’s Spider-Man is also set to appear in another Marvel Studios film per the new agreement. While most of the original series cast are set to return for the threequel, Foxx’s casting further blurs the lines across Sony’s three webslinging franchises, with the previous installment bringing back J.K. Simmons as J. Jonah Jameson from Sam Raimi’s trilogy and the studio’s Sony Universe of Marvel Characters led by Venom expected to crossover into the Marvel Cinematic Universe series soon. Originally scheduled for a July 16, 2021 release, the film was first pushed back to November 5 and will now bow on December 17. The untitled third installment’s previous release date was recently given to Uncharted, with Holland revealing in an Instagram video that production on the webslinging title should begin around February 2021 after the conclusion of the filming for Nathan Drake’s long-awaited big-screen debut. RELATED: Cherry: Apple Acquires Russo Brothers’ Tom Holland-Led Drama Sony’s upcoming Spidey slate includes the Venom sequel, starring Tom Hardy and directed by Andy Serkis, as well as Jared Leto’s in-the-can Morbius, a Kraven the Hunter film, and a spinoff featuring Silver Sable and Black Cat. Should these films interact with the MCU and Tom Holland, it remains to be seen, but the door seems open.

    Monster Hunter Teaser Gives First Look at Black Diablos Plus New Release Date

    Monster Hunter Teaser Gives First Look at Black Diablos Plus New Release Date Sony Pictures has released a new teaser for Paul W.S. Anderson’s upcoming movie adaptation Monster Hunter, featuring a first look at the massive monster Black Diablos and revealing that the film will release in theaters this December. You can check out the teaser now in the player below! RELATED: CS Visits The Set of Blumhouse’s The Craft: Legacy! Monster Hunter centers on the leader of a UN military team named Artemis, played by Jovovich, who is transported to another realm populated by monsters. There she meets the Hunter (Jaa), with the two teaming up to close a portal to prevent monsters from attacking earth. The movie will be a highly stylish big-screen adaptation of the video game. The film adaptation will be led by Milla Jovovich (Resident Evil franchise) and Tony Jaa. It will also star Ron Perlman (Hellboy, Drive), T.I. Harris (Ant-Man and The Wasp), Diego Boneta (Luis Miguel, Rock of Ages), Meagan Good (Code Black), and Josh Helman (X-Men: Days of Future Past). Monster Hunter is written and directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. The film is a production by Sony Pictures, Constantin Film, and Impact Pictures with Anderson, Jeremy Bolt, Robert Kulzer, Martin Moszkowicz, and Dennis Berardi serving as producers. RELATED: Jamie Foxx Returning as Electro for Tom Holland’s Spider-Man 3 The Capcom video game series consists of action role-playing games where players and their friends work together to take down larger-than-life beasts in a living, breathing ecosystem. Since the first Monster Hunter title made its debut 14 years ago in 2004, the series has attracted a dedicated fan base, and grown into a global mega-hit with Monster Hunter: World, the latest title in the series, shipping 10 million units worldwide, with cumulative sales of the series exceeding 49 million units as of August 20, 2018. 

    The Set of Blumhouse’s The Craft: Legacy!

    CS Visits The Set of Blumhouse’s The Craft: Legacy! It seems like a lifetime ago that Comingsoon.net flew to Toronto at the invitation of Sony/Blumhouse to visit the set of their movie The Craft: Legacy. The film is a continuation of the 1996 teen-coven-classic The Craft. In the before-times, aka November 21, 2019, we were driven to the Cinespace Film Studios in Kleinburg Ontario. There we saw what kind of spells were being cast by director Zoe Lister-Jones and spoke with her young coven of stars: Cailee Spaeny (Bad Times at the El Royale, On the Basis of Sex), Zoey Luna (Pose, Boundless), Lovie Simone (Selah & the Spades, Greenleaf), and Gideon Adlon (Blockers, The Mustang). The studio where this magic, based on real practices but invented for the purposes of this film, actually happens has been around since the late 50s. We enter and are greeted by smoke. Fighting the instinct to run away from a smoking building, we press on, and later learn that the smell is Red Cedar: it’s part of a ritual being performed on-screen.Our first glimpse of the set reveals a teenage bedroom where three young witches attempt to call the corners of North, South, East, and West, but unfortunately, they’re missing a fourth witch to properly invoke them. RELATED: Blumhouse’s The Craft Legacy Trailer & Poster: Let the Ritual Begin The original film featured another trio of witches in search of a new member, starring Neve Campbell, Fairuza Balk, and Rachel True. They find their fourth in Robin Tunney, and the coven unleashes a power that seems to heal all the wrongs in their personal lives, but of course comes with a heavy price. There was revenge, magic, fabulous outfits, and a great soundtrack. The Craft endures because of those things, yes, but also goes beyond them to touch on something much deeper. Amidst the spells and power fantasies, this was a film that showed a picture of teenage-bonding that was markedly different from other teen films of the 90s. These girls struggled with the traumas of self harm, racism, abuse, and formed a support system with each other to try and cope. “I’m just so deeply honored to be handed this torch because it was such a seminal film for me, having come of age in the 90s as a real weirdo,” director Zoe Lister-Jones told us. “I shaved my head when I was 12, and was bullied as any young girl with a shaved head would be. And so The Craft, of course, spoke to me as I think I spoke to so many people who felt outside of the norm.” Sitting cross-legged on a very convincing teen bedroom floor, three of the leads in The Craft: Legacy begin calling the corners again. There have been a few takes of this moment, as Lister-Jones adjusts the pacing and attitude of the girls’ interaction.Lourdes leads the chant, while Tabby and Frankie struggle to keep up. One of the witches laments having to call on the power of the South, as it’s full of “white colonist assh*les.” Right out of the gate the question of whether the progressive politics of the original film will be present in this sequel is put to rest. “I think part of what I also wanted to represent with this film,” Lister-Jones explains, “was the hope that I feel seeing what youth culture is pushing in the face of so much bullying, and the oppressive culture that they’re witnessing.” A smart, self-aware script is one thing, but finding the kind of on-screen chemistry present in the original movie is a tall order. The search for the new witches led to the casting of Spaeny, Luna, Simone and Aldon, who all practice “varying degrees of witchy stuff” according to their director. “At their chemistry read, they came in and after—I didn’t know this about any of them—after they finished, they all had crystals in their pockets and in their bras, and were pulling them out.” Between takes we are led off-set to production offices where we get a chance to talk all things witchy with the coven. Spaeny joins us and it’s our first glimpse of her. She’s wearing a crown of pearls. She explains the outfit is part of a scene in which her character, Lily, gets ready for a party with her coven.”Lily’s element is water,” she says, telling us to keep an eye out for pearls and water droplets incorporated into her fashions. Lily is the all-important fourth witch of The Craft: Legacy, who Spaeny describes as kind of a loner. ”Her best friend is her mother. She hasn’t really had friends her own age at all.” Like Sarah (Tunney) in the original film, Lily is “moving into a whole new life with brand new people, starting a new school and then when she meets these girls, everything changes.” One of the most charismatic personalities Lily encounters is Lourdes. She is played by Luna, a similar force of nature, who brings up the energy in our windowless interview room just by entering it. “It was extremely important for me to be in this movie,” she says, “because, I mean, obviously I’m trans and there’s not that many trans people who are in film that aren’t just a f**king sex worker who get killed at the end. I’m doing this for the kids, I’m doing this for the little girls that grew up and didn’t have someone to look up to…and my character, she’s f**king fabulous. And I think that she is opening up a lot of doors.” Lourdes’ element is earth, which is fitting for Luna, who is animated as she describes her goals for her career, but firmly grounded in her sense of self. “I never came out looking to be an activist,” she tells us. “I came out looking to be free and to be myself. For years, people told me who I was or who they thought I was. And when I came out, it did come with a lot of media attention and it came with me having a voice.” Luna began her activism on the part of the trans community at the age of 12, and was discovered by a filmmaker that would go on to document her life in the reality series Raising Zoey.  “I am able to be an activist while also simultaneously being able to produce my meaning into the world by creating art, movies, television,” she says, an artistic privilege she is awed by. Lister-Jones confirmed that those same themes were always planned to be a part of The Craft: Legacy: “It includes topics around a trans-inclusive and intersectional feminism.” For her, it’s a natural evolution of the original film. “I think in the way that the first one was very much ahead of its time, because it was intersectional in many ways, I think including a trans voice in this group of young women was really important to me.” The next element, fire, bounds into the interview room in the form of Simone, who plays Taby. “I was intense, yeah,” she says, laughing after relating a story of her earliest memory of witchcraft. Simone’s magical roots stretch all the way back to the second grade. While in the cafeteria with her friends, she attempted, somewhat successfully, to control the volume of the room with her mind. This led to a fascination with collecting crystals. “I kind of take crystals with me everywhere I go, I’ll show you guys some,” she says offhandedly. Like a close-up magician she produces a collection from various pockets and scatters them across the table while calling out their names: opalite, moonstone, rose quartz, jade and selenite. The opalite is her favorite, “for the third eye chakra.” she explains. “Intuition.” She smiles at the milky smooth stone and purrs, “yeah, she’s nice.” Rounding out the elements is Frankie, who is “air.” Aldon describes her character as a “mix of DJ Khaled and badass feminist energy. She’s worldly. She’s kind of always the goofball. But when it’s time to get down and serious, she understands and she can flip that switch.” Like Simone, Aldon’s connection to magic runs all the way back to her early childhood. “I mean, my grandmother’s a witch, my Mother’s very spiritual. I’ve been a crystal child since I was six years old. So I always dabbled in things like that. But I’ve never done witchcraft, I don’t think I’ll ever cast spells. I don’t think I want to mess with the universe if the universe isn’t messing with me.” For Aldon, the original film made her “feel so cool” because she was always the “weirdo” and the “outsider” at school. “I was bullied,” she tells us, explaining that she had a hard time until she found her own group of friends, her own coven. “I think that really gives space for teenagers to be like, it’s OK. I don’t even think those girls [from The Craft] are weird. They’re unique, they’re artistic. They’re one with the universe.” In between interviews we’re led back to the set, where we hear the sounds of the cast singing “Science Fiction/Double Feature” between takes. This relaxed but joyful feeling extends to the interactions between the Lister-Jones and her leads. “Awesome you guys, really good,” she tells Luna, Aldon, and Simone. The director is dressed in wide-leg purple trousers, a crop top and a sleek bob. An image of effortless cool with a retro 90s edge, she projects a determined, confident, authority. “I love the ad libs at the top,” she enthuses to her cast. It’s clear that Lister-Jones, whose first foray into writer-director work was on the darkly funny film Band-Aid, is giving her actors the freedom to be themselves. After all, who is more of an expert on being and sounding like a teenage girl than a young cast barely clear of their own teenage years? Amidst the technical crew chatter about monitors and shouted commands, we hear the director and cast finish talking the scene through. “Thank you,” Lister-Jones tells her nearly-complete coven. They all return her thanks before readying themselves for the next shot. “I think a story that centers on young people, and young women specifically coming into their power in today’s current climate is really important to me in terms of giving voice to narratives that sometimes have otherwise been marginalized,” Lister-Jones says, “Representing young people and young women authentically,  and really showcasing the struggles that young women are up against. Creating a world that really feels current and fresh.” We’re then told we’re about to get our first look at the complete coven: all four of our witches in one scene. The girls are filling a table with a number of sacred objects and candles as the camera pushes in for an overhead shot, an echo of the opening from the original film. More smoke emanates from the scene, smelling very much like the red cedar that greeted us upon our arrival. The cedar is a specific choice according to Erin Fogel, the on-set witch consultant. “I’ve spoken a lot with the props team around what it’s OK for us to use. And we haven’t used any white sage,” she explains. White sage has come under fire, literally and figuratively, in recent years due to its overuse in the mainstream, divorcing it from its Indigenous, religious roots and leading to shortages of the crop through overharvesting.”We’re using red cedar because we’re in Ontario and that’s what grows here. And it grows in abundance, so it’s not harmful.” This kind of awareness is a large part of Fogel’s job, to honor the traditions of witchcraft while not exploiting them for the purpose of the film. Another part of her job is to make sure that “any energetic spaces that are opened through the practice [of spellcasting] in the film are also closed at the end of the day.” This somewhat explains why we heard one of the cast members exclaim, “you don’t want to open up a ghost on the set” earlier. Andrew Fleming, the director of the original film and an executive producer on The Craft: Legacy, reportedly said that during the filming of the 1996 film’s ritual on the beach, the tides began to behave strangely and wiped out the entire set. The same strange vibes returned during this production, according to Fogel. “There was another location they were working on for some scenes I wasn’t directly a part of, and I think two or three days after they were on set there I got a call,” she said. It was executive producer Daniel Bekerman who told her: “‘I don’t really know how this works, but could you come and, like, help us do something in this space?’” Fogel explained that apparently people had been experiencing some strange energy on-site, including crew who didn’t consider themselves “open” to sensing energy or spirits. They allegedly “described having a sort of heavy feeling on their chest, or just having like a really strong, visceral reaction.” Fogel ended up doing a cleansing ritual the next morning. “I learned that it used to be a hospice for many years,” she recalled, “but the night before I had a dream about the space. And when I got there, it looked exactly the same as it had in my dreams.” Following the ritual, the Bekerman told her he “felt a lot better.” “Magic is real,” Lister-Jones told us in no uncertain terms. She worked with several witches as she crafted her screenplay. Bri Luna, known as “The Hood Witch” advised her how to incorporate Brujeria and Hoodoo Voodoo traditions, specifically. Pam Grossman, author of “Waking the Witch” and host of “The Witch Wave” podcast also consulted. ”I wanted [the cast] to each come from traditions that were representative of the varying communities that practice witchcraft,” Lister-Jones said. “Without naming them specifically, I wanted to make sure they were sort of ‘in the ether.’ That we were seeing witchcraft means so many things to so many different communities, and is still so stigmatized.” Spaeny felt that the original film took the stigma out of being a witch for young girls. “It opened up doors for that for a lot of women, and [The Craft: Legacy] kind of has for me, too. This whole process has opened my eyes to witchcraft in general.” She and her castmates performed rituals as a way of solidifying their bonds, involving affirmation candles, full moon rites, and karaoke. “You know,” Spaeny says in a lower voice, “a lot of people who are close to me, a lot of older people, are really scared for me to do this project. I’m from Missouri.” RELATED: Zac Efron in Talks to Lead Blumhouse’s Firestarter Remake We watch on set as the coven films the last scene of the day we will get to see. The girls are helping each other get ready for a party, and they’re debating the use of their newfound powers. A bully they worked some magic on has apparently now seen the error of his ways, as one of the coven says, aghast, “he called himself cisgender in 7th period!” Taby emphasizes that they still need to “talk through everything we do.” Lily, for her part, seems distracted—perhaps not taking the need for a more thoughtful approach to magic seriously enough. Perhaps a harbinger of trouble to come? We leave the studios a handful of hours before the crew will come to strike this set and rebuild a new one for tomorrow’s shooting. Walking into the late night air, one thing is abundantly clear: The Craft: Legacy aims to be an exploration of how the teen girls of today form bonds around witchcraft, and what that means to them. It is heavily influenced by the original film, but also seeks to build on its themes. For Lister-Jones, “It’s really just about showcasing young women in all of their glory, and in ways that we might not have seen before,” she said. “About women in communities supporting each other rather than turning against each other.” The Craft: Legacy will be widely available on PVOD this Halloween for a 48-hour rental period as well as premium digital purchase in North America starting midnight October 28.

    Jamie Foxx Returning as Electro for Tom Holland’s Spider-Man 3

    Jamie Foxx returning as Electro for Tom Holland’s Spider-Man 3 Though the film he was a part of may have received generally mixed reviews and led to the cancellation of its series, Sony is in final talks to bring back Jamie Foxx as iconic Spider-Man villain Electro for the forthcoming third installment in the Tom Holland-starring franchise, according to The Hollywood Reporter. RELATED: J.K. Simmons Says There Is ‘A Distinct Chance’ We See More of His J. Jonah Jameson in Spider-Man 3 While most of the original series cast are set to return for the threequel, Foxx’s casting further blurs the lines across Sony’s three webslinging franchises, with the previous installment bringing back J.K. Simmons as J. Jonah Jameson from Sam Raimi’s trilogy and the studio’s Sony Universe of Marvel Characters led by Venom expected to crossover into the Marvel Cinematic Universe series soon. Foxx previously portrayed the role in 2014’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2 helmed by Marc Webb and starring Andrew Garfield in the titular role, but after it underperformed at the box office with $708.9 million worldwide on its estimated $200 million budget and received mixed reviews from critics and fans, Sony cancelled future plans including a third Garfield-led film and Sinister Six and Venom spin-offs. Originally scheduled for a July 16, 2021 release, the film was first pushed back to November 5 and will now bow on December 17. The untitled third installment’s previous release date was recently given to Uncharted, with Holland revealing in an Instagram video that production on the webslinging title should begin around February 2021 after the conclusion of the filming for Nathan Drake’s long-awaited big-screen debut. The news comes the same day as competitor studios Disney, Paramount and Warner Bros. all announced the delays of a number of their major releases including Christopher Nolan’s Tenet, the live-action adaptation of Mulan, John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place Part II, the long-awaited Tom Cruise sequel Top Gun: Maverick and James Cameron’s four Avatar sequels. Tom Holland will return for the film as the titular wall-crawler, and it remains to be seen what villains he’ll go up against in the trilogy caper. Given the ending of Far From Home however, any number of his rogues gallery are likely eager for a fight. The third installment to the MCU’s Spider-Man films will also feature the return of Zendaya (Euphoria, Dune) as MJ. Holland’s Spider-Man is also set to appear in another Marvel Studios film per the new agreement. RELATED: Shang-Chi to Resume Production in Australia By the End of the Month Sony’s upcoming Spidey slate includes the Venom sequel, starring Tom Hardy and directed by Andy Serkis, as well as Jared Leto’s in-the-can Morbius, a Kraven the Hunter film, and a spinoff featuring Silver Sable and Black Cat. Should these films interact with the MCU and Tom Holland, it remains to be seen, but the door seems open.

    J.K. Simmons Says THERE’S ‘A Distinct Chance’ We See More of His J. Jonah Jameson in Spider-Man 3

    J.K. Simmons Says There Is A ‘Distinct Chance’ We See More of His J. Jonah Jameson in Spider-Man 3 One of the highlights of Marvel’s Spider-Man: Far From Home was the surprising cameo by J.K. Simmons as editor-in-chief of The Daily Bugle, J. Jonah Jameson. In a recent interview with Collider, Simmons revealed that he is optimistic future Spidey films will feature his take on the character. “There is a distinct chance, there have been discussions, and I’m not going to say anything definitive [laughter] because I don’t know if I’m allowed to. But yes, I’m very optimistic that I’ll have some more J.J.J. in my future.” RELATED: J.K. Simmons Says His Next J. Jonah Jameson Cameo Has Already Been Filmed Simmons then went on to talk about the cameo which happened very quickly after a meeting with Marvel executives. “The only thing we didn’t a hundred percent see eye to eye on, I think, was how much is this character going to be the character from, I think, the comic books and from the Sam Raimi original trilogy, and how much do we want to evolve it and to have it be more contemporary or more… you know.” Despite his yearning to retread his previous performance — why else would you cast him if you didn’t want that J. Jonah Jameson — the actor eventually came to terms on a more contemporary take. Read: a bald version of the character. “Which I think honestly, that decision might’ve just been them going, ‘We don’t have time to make a wig. We got to shoot him tomorrow in the office,'” explained Simmons. “So, J. Jonah Jameson either lost his hair in the last few years, or he was wearing a hairpiece the whole time. I don’t know, you pick.” Spidey fans remember all too well the actor’s spot-on portrayal of the character in Sam Raimi’s original trilogy of films, so it was cool to see Simmons reprise a role he was clearly born to play. Hopefully, there is more to come! RELATED: J.K. Simmons Discusses Commissioner Gordon’s Role in the Snyder Cut Spider-Man: Far From Home stars Tom Holland (Spider-Man: Homecoming) as Peter Parker, Samuel L. Jackson (Spider-Man: Homecoming) as Nick Fury, Jon Favreau (The Lion King) as Happy Hogan, Zendaya (Euphoria) as MJ, and Jake Gyllenhaal (Nightcrawler) as Mysterio. Spider-Man: Far From Home is directed by Jon Watts (Spider-Man: Homecoming) and written by Chris McKenna and Erik Sommers and based on a Marvel Comic book by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko. The film is produced by Kevin Feige and Amy Pascal. Executive Producers are Louis D’Esposito, Victoria Alonso, Thomas M. Hammel, Eric Hauserman Carroll, Rachel O’Connor, the late Stan Lee, Avi Arad, and Matt Tolmach.

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