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(For Southeast Asia) PlayStation®Partner Awards 2021 Japan Asia PARTNER AWARD & SPECIAL AWARD Winners Announced!

PARTNER AWARD SPECIAL AWARD PARTNER AWARD Awarded to titles developed in the Japan / Asia region with top-ranked worldwide sales between October 2020 and September 2021, with particularly noteworthy activity results*. Tales of ARISE (BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc.) A Traditional and Innovative JRPG Masterpiece Tales of Arise is the latest installment of the popular Tales […]
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    The only real Cortana-powered speaker is approximately to reduce Cortana

    Harman Kardon's Invoke was the first speaker to use Microsoft's Cortana speaker, and as it later turned out, also the last. In 2020, Microsoft said it would end consumer support for Cortana on iOS, Android and Invoke by early 2021 and use the AI assistant exclusively for business apps like Microsoft 365. That day has now come, as Harman Kardon has announced that it will soon release a software update that disables Cortana and turns the Invoke into a regular Bluetooth speaker, Thurott has reported.  The update will arrive tomorrow, so in a FAQ, Harman Kardon advised owners to leave the speaker "connected to the internet and kept online overnight between 2 AM and 5 AM local time." The update will end after June 30th, 2021, but the Samsung-owned company noted that "Cortana service... will end in the coming months regardless of whether you receive the update." The Invoke was a very good smart speaker when it arrived in 2017, with excellent sound quality and device compatibility, though Cortana's lack of skills was a weak point. Harmon Karman noted that it had no choice in the matter as it was Microsoft's decision to end support. When the software giant first announced that it would remove Cortana from Invoke, it did offer buyers a $50 gift card as an olive branch, however. Microsoft will soon end Cortana support on its own Surface headphones, too. 

    Sonos' Roam can pass music to other speakers reportedly

    More details of Sonos' portable Roam speaker are dribbling out, and they suggest there will be more to draw you in besides the size and price. The Verge claims the Roam will include a few advantages over the larger Move, most notably "Sound Swap." The feature can reportedly pass music from the Roam to a nearby Sonos speaker when you hold the play/pause button. You could start playing an album on the Roam in your backyard, for instance, and finish listening on a more powerful Five when you're ready to head inside. The Roam will also let you use Bluetooth and WiFi at the same time, unlike the Move. You could play music from your phone across your whole Sonos setup using Bluetooth You'll also get the same automatic sound tuning (that is, Trueplay) as the Move, according to the leak. And yes, there's IP67 water and dust resistance for those times you're caught out in the rain. Sonos is expected to introduce the Roam at a March 9th virtual event and ship it on April 20th for $169. That would still make it one of the costlier portable speakers on the market, but Sound Swap and automatic tuning could tip the balance if you're more interested in convenience and fidelity than raw volume.

    Ever heard a catchy song on your smart speaker and wanted to share it right away? You can act on that impulse if you have an Echo. Amazon is rolling out a music sharing feature that lets you share songs with Alexa contacts using Echo devices or the Alexa app. Ask the voice assistant to “share this song with” a contact and they can not only choose to listen, but send a reaction. Thankfully, you don’t need to use Amazon Music or even the same streaming service as your recipient. Alexa will try to find a track on any services available to you. If there’s no match, you’ll still get a station based on the artist’s name and song title. You can try the feature by enabling Alexa Communications. If you’re not sure about the contacts that can receive a song, you can start a new message to see who’s available. Amazon characterized this as “just the beginning” of the sharing feature, hinting at possible upgrades in the future. For now, though, the feature could be helpful if you’d rather not turn to text messages or social networks just to spread the word about a can’t-miss tune — at least, so long as your friends are as invested in the Alexa ecosystem as you are.

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