Sunday, May 9, 2021

Yakuza Combat Will Forward Be Turn-Based Going

Following the reveal of Lost Judgment, an interview with Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio director Toshihiro Nagoshi and producer Kazuki Hosokawa has surfaced on IGN. Lost Judgment brings Ryu Ga Gotoku back to its action-combat roots, leaving many fans to wonder if that meant the Yakuza series would also return to that style following last year's Yakuza: Like a Dragon.Speaking to IGN, Nagoshi and Hosokawa confirmed that the Judgment series will carry on the studio's action style of gameplay, while Yakuza will continue to evolve as a turn-based RPG. "The Yakuza series has been transformed into a turn-based RPG," they told IGN. "On the other hand, over the years, Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio has accumulated resources and know-how of making flashy and exhilarating action games that are effortless to enjoy. We decided that we should let our signature action gameplay live on through Lost Judgment." Yakuza: Like a Dragon's turn-based combat Romain Mahut of GameBlog was in attendance at a virtual "Judgment Day" event that followed the Lost Judgment reveal and asked if the studio considered using turn-based combat similar to that of Yakuza: Like a Dragon for Lost Judgment. "For Yakuza: Like a Dragon, we changed the game's battle system from action into a turn-based RPG," Nagoshi said in response. "This was a huge challenge for us, but it was well-received, which we were thrilled to hear. We did discuss the possibility of developing that battle system further for our next title, and while we may pursue the turn-based system even outside the Yakuza series, the conclusion we ended up at was that because this is a different series, the best approach would be to keep them separate and refine what makes each series great. It's my hope that our customers feel the same way we do. That's why we chose 'action' as an important keyword for the Judgment series.  Nagoshi also said on the Judgment Day video he believes that, when possible, a simultaneous global launch is "the right way to go" and that the team has "determined to make every effort to support this for all [its] games moving forward." This is significant as the Yakuza series has a long tradition of Western versions releasing years after the Japanese version. Following the success of Yakuza 0 in the West, the release windows have narrowed, but Yakuza: Like a Dragon, which debuted last year, still had a 10-month gap between the Japanese and worldwide releases. Lost Judgment's action-oriented combat Yakuza: Like a Dragon is available now on PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC, while Lost Judgment comes to PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One on September 24. For more on what we thought about Yakuza: Like a Dragon, check out our review here. For more on the history of the Yakuza series, read our retrospective featuring interviews with Nagoshi and other members of the team here. For more information on Nagoshi's career, you can read our profile on him here. [Source: IGN, Sega of America on YouTube]
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    Apple's Irish tax deal will be scrutinized by Europe's highest court

    Sponsored Links Yves Herman / reuters The European Commission refuses to back down in its long-running legal battle against Apple and the Irish government’s tax arrangements. Today, the executive branch of the European Union announced that it would appeal a decision granted by the General Court in July that sided with the juggernaut technology company. The Commission believes that the Court “made a number of errors of law” and wants the case re-examined by the European Court of Justice — the highest form of scrutiny in the EU. “We need to continue our efforts to put in place the right legislation to address loopholes and ensure transparency,” Margrethe Vestager, the European Commissioner for Competition said in a statement. So what exactly are they fighting over? Money. Specifically, how much Apple has been paying in taxes to the Irish authorities. The company has operated in the country for decades and, like many other large multinationals, benefitted from its historically low tax rates. In the metaphorical eyes of the Commission, though, Apple has been given preferential treatment. That’s why the company has been paying an effective rate of tax that’s close to one percent. The Commission launched an investigation in 2014 and declared three months later that Apple’s situation should be categorised as state aid. Then, in 2016, it ruled that Apple owed Ireland roughly $14.5 billion in unpaid tax. Unsurprisingly, Apple disagreed. The company’s appeals were initially unsuccessful, however. In 2016, it started transferring money into an escrow account that would only be emptied once a final decision was made. By September 2018, the company had all of its unpaid taxes, plus interest, in that holding account. Apple hasn’t given up on its legal defence, however, and won a remarkable decision this year. The General Court said the Commission couldn’t prove that Apple was given preferential treatment and, as a result, the deal can’t be declared as state aid. The Commission is desperate to win the case, however, to bring more taxes back into the EU market, which is currently grappling with a pandemic-fuelled downturn. “If Member States give certain multinational companies tax advantages not available to their rivals, this harms fair competition in the European Union in breach of State aid rules,” Vestager said. “We have to continue to use all tools at our disposal to ensure companies pay their fair share of tax. Otherwise, the public purse and citizens are deprived of funds for much needed investments – the need for which is even more acute now to support Europe’s economic recovery.” Apple thinks differently. “The General Court categorically annulled the Commission’s case in July and the facts have not changed since then,” a spokesperson for the company said. “This case has never been about how much tax we pay, rather where we are required to pay it. We will review the Commission’s appeal when we receive it, however it will not alter the factual conclusions of the General Court, which prove that we have always abided by the law in Ireland, as we do everywhere we operate.” In this article: politics, EU, Ireland, taxes, apple, europe, news, gear All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 43 Shares Share Tweet Share

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