Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Official PlayStation Podcast Episode 394: Crash Landing

Email us at [email protected]! Subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google or RSS, or download here Hey y’all! This week we sit down with composer Bobby Krlic, who shares the creative process behind crafting Returnal’s soundtrack. Stuff We Talked About Mass Effect Legendary EditionOddworld: SoulstormReturnal (interview begins at 21:20)Outer Wilds The WitnessDisco Elysium – The Final CutGames that made us see things differently in the real world The Cast Sid Shuman – Senior Director of Content Communications, SIE Tim Turi –  Senior Content Communications Specialist, SIE Thanks to Cory Schmitz for our beautiful logo and Dormilón for our rad theme song and show music. [Editor’s note: PSN game release dates are subject to change without notice. Game details are gathered from press releases from their individual publishers and/or ESRB rating descriptions.]
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    Verizon's 5G Home Internet arrives in 10 new locations

    Verizon (owner of Engadget's parent company Verizon Media) has expanded its 5G Home Internet service's availability, launching it in 10 new cities this month. Starting on March 18th, the service will roll out to parts of Cleveland, OH; Las Vegas, NV; Louisville, KY; Omaha, NE and San Diego, CA. A few days after that, on March 25th, the service will also be available in parts of Charlotte, NC; Cincinnati, OH; Hartford, CT; Kansas City, MO and Salt Lake City, UT. The carrier launched its 5G Home internet service back in 2018, promising typical download speeds of around 300 Mbps and max speeds of up to 1 Gbps with no data caps. As the name implies, it doesn't need a cable or fiber hookup, just the company's "Internet Gateway" device that customers can set up on their own. It was only available in five cities for quite some time, because Verizon pushed back its broader rollout to wait for more powerful equipment to come in. The service costs $50 a month for current customers with eligible mobile plans or $70 a month for non-Verizon customers.  Verizon has also recently announced winning between 140 and 200 megahertz of C-Band spectrum in every available market from the latest FCC auction. That'll allow the company to expand its 5G Ultra Wideband's availability, though only those with premium unlimited plans will be able to access C-Band's faster speeds.

    Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile spent $78 billion on C-band spectrum for 5G

    The Federal Communications Commission has shared the results of its long-awaited C-band spectrum auction. A company called Cellco Partnership, better known as Verizon (Engadget's parent company), came away from the proceedings the clear winner. It spent $45.4 billion, more than every other participant combined, to secure 3,511 individual 20Mhz blocks of spectrum across the country. AT&T came in second place, winning 1,621 licenses on a $23.4 billion spend. In third place, you have two different companies. In terms of spend, it was T-Mobile with its $9.3 billion in bids, but US Cellular came ahead of the carrier with 254 licenses to its 142. All told, the auction raised more than $81 billion, significantly more than the $20 to $30 billion windfall that was projected last summer. All big three carriers will use the spectrum to build out their 5G networks. For Verizon, however, the auction was a must-win in many ways. To date, its buildout has mostly depended on mmWave spectrum. That’s allowed it to build a 5G network that is fast, but not very comprehensive. Millimeter waves are notoriously fickle. They can’t travel far and they oscillate so quickly they tend to scatter against any walls and obstacles they meet. Its new spectrum will allow Verizon to build out its 5G network without deploying cell sites at every intersection. Now that #CBand auction results are public, time for carriers to start explaining what they are going to do with their billions of dollars of new spectrum.Verizon is up first with an investor day on 3/10. T-Mobile goes next with its own analyst event on 3/11. — Eli Blumenthal (@eliblumenthal) February 24, 2021 What’s most surprising is the amount of money AT&T spent. It only recently reduced its debt load to about $164 billion and now it’s spending $23.4 billion. But while T-Mobile could afford to sit back because of its $23 billion merger with Sprint, AT&T could not. The carrier needs that spectrum to stay competitive. Just as notable are the companies that didn’t walk away with any spectrum. Comcast, Charter and Cox formed a joint venture called C&C Wireless Holding to take part in the auction and didn’t win any licenses. In many ways, it’s only the easy part that’s done now. Now the carriers need to actually build the infrastructure that will take advantage of the spectrum they won. It may also take a while before most people see the benefits of those investments. While some C-band spectrum will be available by the end of the year, other parts won’t be ready until 2023.

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