Sunday, July 3, 2022

Sucker Punch Says It’s Not Working On Infamous Or Sly Cooper, And No Other Studio Is Either

Sucker Punch Productions, the studio behind 2020’s hit new IP Ghost of Tsushima, has revealed it is not working on anything related to its previous Infamous and Sly Cooper franchises. The studio also says that no other developer is working on projects related to the franchises.  This news comes from a new blog post highlighting Sucker Punch’s 25th anniversary. Since opening its doors more than 20 years ago, the studio has worked on Rocket: Robot on Wheels, the popular Sly Cooper platformer series, the superpowered Infamous series, and of course, Ghost of Tsushima. In this blog post, though, the studio clarifies some things amidst rumors of a Sly Cooper 5 and an Infamous remake.  Sly Cooper “As our games continue to grow in scale and complexity, they require the full attention of our studio,” the blog post reads. “With our focus on our current project, we have no plans to revisit Infamous or Sly Cooper right now, and no other studio is currently working on projects related to those franchises either. These characters are very special and near and dear to our hearts, so while we’d never say never to re-opening those doors down the road, for now, there are no Infamous or Sly Cooper games in development.”  Elsewhere, the studio says it will soon perform maintenance on Infamous 2 UGC servers to move them to a new home allowing them to stay up longer. However, Sucker Punch says it will eventually need to sunset the servers but “[we] want to keep them running for as long as possible for players who are still active.” Sucker Punch is also working on getting Infamous Second Son’s Cole’s Legacy DLC, previously only available as part of the game’s Collector’s Edition, on the PlayStation Store in all territories.  “Thank you to everyone for an incredible 24+ years of support,” Sucker Punch writes. “Your love and appreciation are what fuel us to keep making new games and new worlds, and we look forward to continuing to bring new and exciting ideas to life for many years to come. We’re not ready to talk about whatever might be next, but we hope you’ll keep following us whenever we’re ready to share more.”  My money’s on a sequel to Ghost of Tsushima, but who knows what the studio’s working on right now. Hopefully, we will learn soon. For now, read Game Informer’s Ghost of Tsushima review.  Would you prefer a Sly Cooper 5 or an Infamous remake? Let us know in the comments below!
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    Apple won’t collect fees on paid Facebook events until 2021

    Sponsored Links Facebook Last month, Facebook and Apple clashed over App Store fees. Now, Apple seems to be easing up slightly. Businesses that host paid online events through Facebook on iOS will be able to keep all of their earnings (minus taxes), Facebook announced today. Apple will not collect its usual 30 percent commission on in-app purchases, but there are a few conditions. As you might remember, this summer, Facebook announced a new feature that allows businesses and creators to charge for online events hosted on the platform. Facebook said it wouldn’t collect fees from the events “for at least the next year.” But Facebook couldn’t convince Apple to waive its 30 percent fee or allow iOS users to use Facebook Pay, so that Facebook could absorb the costs for businesses. Facebook spoke out against Apple and its App Store fees. Now, Apple has agreed to let Facebook Pay process all paid online event purchases. This means Facebook can absorb the cost, and Apple won’t get a cut. But this agreement only lasts until December 31st. “Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will have to, yet again, pay Apple the full 30 percent App Store tax,” a Facebook spokesperson said. Facebook will not collect fees until August 2021. The other big catch is that Facebook Gaming creators are left out of the deal. They’ll still have to hand over 30 percent of earnings that come through the iOS app. “Apple’s decision to not collect its 30 percent tax on paid online events comes with a catch: gaming creators are excluded from using Facebook Pay in paid online events on iOS,” said Vivek Sharma, VP of Facebook Gaming. “We unfortunately had to make this concession to get the temporary reprieve for other businesses.” These battles over App Store fees are becoming more common. Sometimes they go better than others. Epic is now embroiled in a nasty legal battle with Apple, but Basecamp found a way to skirt Apple’s rules to get its Hey email app approved. Just yesterday, Epic, Spotify and others announced The Coalition for App Fairness, an alliance formed to pressure Apple and Google to change their app store rules. In this article: facebook, facebook gaming, apple, app store, fees, in-app purchases, iap, commission, waive, facebook pay, small businesses, online events, creators, news, gear, gaming All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Comments 59 Shares Share Tweet Share

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