Saturday, December 4, 2021

Quake Receives A Fresh Update With Machine Games Providing A New Horde Mode

Quake, which was re-released for modern consoles and PC back in August, is receiving even more love from the devs at Bethesda and Wolfenstein developer Machine Games with a new mode and content added with Update 2. Out today on all platforms, Update 2 brings a host of big fixes, but most importantly, an entirely new Horde Mode. Developed by the team at Machine Games, Quakes Horde Mode pits teams of 1-4 local or online players (or bots!) against swarms of AI enemies on four brand new horde maps. Every third wave of baddies will include a boss which coughs up a silver key which can be cashed in to collect more weapons and items, bolstering your arsenal for further battles. Click here to watch embedded media Also included in Update 2 is an add-on called Honey where you'll "delve deep into the darkness to conquer a deadly plague infecting the land." It's a new Quake experience authored by senior level designer Christian Grawer from Machine Games. Quake is making its Epic Games Store debut today, as well. Pick it up there if EGS is your PC game launcher of choice. You can find the full contents of Update 2 here.  Are you going to squad up with friends and take on rounds of devious Quake hordes? Let us know in the comments!
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    Chrome for Android enables you to preview web links

    You no longer have to tap links in Chrome for Android and wonder what awaits you on the other side. 9to5Google reports that Chrome 89 for Android has received a "preview page" feature through a server-side update. Long-press a link and tap the option and you'll get a glimpse of a web link without having to leave the site you're on.  This peeking concept isn't completely new, and arguably isn't the best implementation. Safari and Microsoft Edge on iOS can already preview a link using a long press, and without having to tap a confirmation. Google's approach is slower and has been in development for more than two years. Still, this could be very helpful. You can find out if a page is worth opening without having to open a new tab, for example. You'll only have to load new pages if and when you're ready to commit.

    Xbox test brings Microsoft's Chromium-based Edge browser to consoles

    You might finally have a good reason to use the web browser on your console for more than the bare necessities. The Verge reports that Microsoft has started testing a version of its Chromium-based Edge browser on the Xbox One and Series X/S. Participate in the Alpha Skip-Ahead testing ring and you'll get a web experience that's more in line with the modern era, including better compatibility and syncing with Edge across multiple platforms. This version is unsurprisingly buggy and doesn't include mouse or keyboard support. And while this theoretically enables access to Google Stadia, we wouldn't count on reliable access to that or other intensive web apps just yet. It may take a while before there's a more polished version of the new Edge for Xbox. When it is ready, though, the new browser could make a better case for buying an Xbox if web surfing matters to you. Right now, the PlayStation 5 doesn't even have an easily accessible web browser (you have to rely on tricks to use it at all). While that could change, a Chromium-based Xbox browser could give Microsoft a comfortable head start.

    Tesla ditches pushes and forums fans to take political action with Engage

    Tesla has created a new website for its fans, one mainly designed to spur them to political action on its behalf. Dubbed Tesla Engage, it was spotted by CNBC and Electrek. The company says it made the platform “to create a digital home base for all of our work, and make it easier for Tesla community members to learn what's top of mind for us, take meaningful action, and stay in the loop.” So far, Tesla is pushing a handful of causes. One calls on people to donate to disaster relief charities in Texas after the unprecedented winter storms that left much of the state without electricity. Texas, it should be noted, is home to its upcoming Austin Gigafactory, as well as Space X's facilities in Boca Chica. Yet another post urges people who live in Nebraska to call state legislators in support of LB 633 — a bill that, if passed, would allow the company to sell its cars to customers there directly. With the launch of Engage, the automaker is also winding down its official forums. On March 15th, they’ll be transitioned to read-only. At the moment, only the company can publish new posts on Engage. But as a customer, you can create a profile and comment on its posts, as well as earn likes for your replies and follow other people. All of that makes Tesla Engage not a one-to-one copy of the outgoing forums.

    Google helps it be simpler to test experimental features in Chrome

    It turns out increasing the cadence of Chrome updates isn’t the only change Google has planned for its web browser. In a tweet spotted by 9to5Google (via XDA Developers), Chrome design head Alex Ainslie detailed a new feature that makes it easier to try out any experimental functionality that Google is working on. As of this week, the browser’s Canary version includes a beaker icon where you can enable experimental features, as well as send feedback to the Chrome team. 👩‍🔬 We hope to gather more feedback about @googlechrome updates as they're in development. If you're using Canary today (and soon Dev and Beta) you'll notice a little beaker on the toolbar that makes it easier to try out new stuff and share suggestions about how it should evolve. pic.twitter.com/doPLzJbnRW — Alex Ainslie (@alexainslie) March 5, 2021 In the past, trying out experiments in Chrome meant enabling flags. That made them tricky to access if you didn’t know what you were doing. It also wasn’t easy to see at a glance which ones you had enabled. Ainslie said Google is adding the menu to collect more feedback on updates as they’re in development. To that end, the beaker icon will make its way to the developer and beta versions of Chrome as well. That means you won't have to use Chrome's least stable release to see what Google has in store for users.

    Google mobile search redesign targets results, not frills

    You might soon have an easier time searching the web from your phone. Google is rolling out a visual redesign of mobile search that should help you focus on the results rather than... well, everything surrounding them. Results pages now run edge-to-e...

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