Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Resident Evil Village DLC Announced

Resident Evil Village had no season pass or much in the way of future plans outside of RE: Verse, the attached multiplayer project coming in July. However, Capcom has just revealed that it is creating DLC for Resident Evil Village “due to popular demand.” The publisher and developer did not give any details on what this upcoming DLC would be.And that might be because it is very early in development and likely wasn’t planned beforehand, hence the lack of a season pass. The slide announcing the DLC said Capcom was just starting on it, meaning we probably won’t see anything for some time. The slide ended with Capcom promising “more info later.”MORE: Netflix’s Live-Action Resident Evil Series Reveals Main CastResident Evil has had a bunch of odd DLC. Resident Evil 7 had a slew of unique packs from a Saw-like version of the card game 21 to a roguelike adventure to a free campaign starring Chris Redfield. It was all wildly different and it remains to be seen if Capcom will emulate this off-the-wall approach with Village or go for a more story-based expansion.MORE: Ada Wong Was Cut From Resident Evil Village
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    The Oldsmar, Florida water plant hacked earlier this week used outdated Windows 7 PCs and shared passwords, the Associated Press has reported. A government advisory also revealed that the relatively unsophisticated attack used the remote-access program TeamViewer. However, officials also said that the hacker’s attempt to boost chemicals to dangerous levels was stopped almost immediately after it started. “The cyber actors likely accessed the system by exploiting cybersecurity weaknesses, including poor password security and an outdated Windows 7 operating system to compromise software used to remotely manage water treatment,” according to investigators. "The actor also likely used the desktop sharing software TeamViewer to gain unauthorized access to the system." The unknown attacker logged into TeamViewer, accessed sensitive systems and attempted to boost lye levels by 100 times. A supervisor monitoring one of the systems saw a mouse pointer move across the screen and “immediately noticed the change in dosing amounts,” according to the advisory. They were able to reverse it immediately and the water treatment process was unaffected. If it hadn’t been observed, the alteration would have taken 24-36 hours to affect the water supply and the changes would have been detected and stopped by plant safeguards. Windows 7 has not been patched with security updates in over a year. On top of everything else, the computers were “connected directly to the Internet without any type of firewall protection installed,” the advisory said. The Oldsmar hack was an accident waiting to happen, according to experts. “We have known for a long time that municipal water utilities are extremely underfunded and under-resourced, and that makes them a soft target for cyberattacks,” Dragos Security’s Lesley Carhart told the AP. “In a lot of cases, all of them have a very small IT staff. Some of them have no dedicated security staff at all.”

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